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A busy few weeks

Discussion in 'General Woodturning Discussion' started by TXMoon, Nov 10, 2019.

  1. TXMoon

    TXMoon Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Howdy all,

    I haven't posted anything and a while but am still around. It's been a busy couple of weeks, unfortunately not in the shop. But I did pick up a trunk load of fresh cut Pecan last week and am cutting it down to blanks. I do have a general question, fodder for discussion if you will. When looking at a blank for a bowl, which do you make the base or top? The bark side (A) or pith side (B)? Does it matter? If the wood were big enough, would you ever turn with the pith/bark on the outside (around axis C)?

    Pecan 01.jpg Pecan 02.jpg PS: I sealed the ends after the pictures. I don't want all this beautiful wood splitting on me.
     
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  2. Lou Currier

    Lou Currier Member Full Member

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    I turn wood with pith in it all the time. It is a truly magnificent part of a tree that I like to show case. As far as your other question, there is no right or wrong answer, although if you want a natural edge piece, the bark side needs to be the top :sarcastic:
     
  3. TXMoon

    TXMoon Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    I would agree, but how do you keep the piece from splitting or warping like a Dali painting?
     
  4. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member

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    On the last picture, B side would be my bottom as it looks like a small band of color there. If I ended up turning it away, no big deal because the grain would still be interesting. If you turned A side as the bottom, you would have the color of the small dark band only on the rim opposing/apposing each other. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)
     
  5. Lou Currier

    Lou Currier Member Full Member

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    a lot of CA :sarcastic:

    as far as warping you can use the same approach to drying as any other bowl blank. If a crack develops just use some type of media to fill it then CA.

    74282484-C02F-4D15-A61A-49BF8D106455.jpeg
     
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  6. TXMoon

    TXMoon Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Oh good idea. I'll keep that in mind. With this piece it's narrower than a No.2 pencil so I am sure it'll be turned away.
     
  7. TXMoon

    TXMoon Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    wow, very nice.
     
  8. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member

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    If they are still green, turn them to at least the 10% you've probably heard of. Fill the bowl with the shavings, and bag until you think it's dry. Remount, and turn to finish .......
    I don't normally do that with our native woods as they are pretty stable. I'll turn a 12" or larger bowl to 1/2 - 5/8" thickness, and then set it on a shelf in the house until I think it's dry, usually about 6 weeks max here in Tucson. I then re-turn and don't really have any problems on over 85% of the pieces I do this to. Sometimes a crack or two will appear, but most have cracks when I first started.......... Jerry (Tucson)
     
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  9. trc65

    trc65 Member Full Member

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    Kevin, instead of answering your question, I'll give a plug for a reference book.

    "The Art of Turned Bowls" by Richard Raffan

    Spends a lot of time talking and showing how to choose and cut blanks to highlight different grain patterns. Tons of pictures. Also many chapters dealing with the shapes and features of bowls.

    One of my favorite reference books and I go back to it over and over.
     
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    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  10. Mike Mills

    Mike Mills Member Full Member

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    The grain pattern will differ depending on how you position your bowl in the log.


    Brian Havens has several which you may also find interesting.




    Along with the Raffan book, Turning Green Wood by Michael O'Donnell is very good and usually about $10 used on Amazon.
     
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  11. TXMoon

    TXMoon Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Wow, some great videos! I'll watch them again then go attack that Pecan.
     
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