Anyone know anything about the Huldra AR's?

Schroedc

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Was at the local fleet farm store abd they had a few Huldra AR's on clearance. The base model was the display model, with the manager discount for the display ended up being 320.00 for rifle and six magazines. Did I do ok or am I going to hate this thing?
 

MKTacop

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Are the upper and lower aluminum or polymer? If aluminum, are they cast or forged? Is the trigger smooth or "gritty"? Fixed stock or adjustable? Mil-Spec buffer tube or Commercial Spec? Chambered in 5.56 or .223?
 

Schroedc

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Are the upper and lower aluminum or polymer? If aluminum, are they cast or forged? Is the trigger smooth or "gritty"? Fixed stock or adjustable? Mil-Spec buffer tube or Commercial Spec? Chambered in 5.56 or .223?

Forged, 556, adjustable, trigger seemed smooth.
 

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Is it gas or piston operated? What model is it?

I'm looking at Huldra's website.
 

Schroedc

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Is it gas or piston operated? What model is it?

I'm looking at Huldra's website.

It's the base model, I'm on the road now will have to get the model number later, gas operated.
 

MKTacop

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After a bit of googling, I'd say you did well to get an AR for that price. The piston system will make the rifle much easier to clean. The base model will still offer a good platform to work from. The cool thing about ARs is that they are almost infinitely customizable.
 

Kevin

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And another one bites the dust . . . .

Never heard of Huldra before. Most of their AR's seem to be piston based on a quick reading vs direct impingement. Huldra claims to have a proprietary action (many manufacturer do). From their website:

Instead of directing the gases into the receiver, they go into a gas plug and drive rod sleeve. The gases are contained inside the drive rod sleeve and push the bolt carrier rearward using the gas pressure to cycle action.

Once the action is cycled the remaining gases are pushed out of the front of the gas block, purging the system and keeping the gases out of the face of the user and the receiver.

The end result is a firearm that functions and feels like an AR15 / M16 but burns cooler, cleaner, and is more reliable. The Huldra Mark IV has gone further than just a patented revolutionary operating system. All of the Adams Arms gas piston components are treated in today's most technologically advanced coating process on the market. The gas piston system and block are Melonited and the bolt carrier is ion bonded. All of the Piston System parts that operate this rifle come with a lifetime warranty.


IOW it's a piston drive. That's good. I own two Bushmasters and one DPMS Panther in 5.56/.223 which all use piston drive. I wouldn't own a gas impingement system unless I wanted to build an AR sniper rifle, and if I wanted to build an AR sniper rifle based on 5.56/.223 I would be an idiot anyway and would deserve what I ended up with. An overpriced under-performing 10 pound POS at least for a sniper rifle. Gas impingement isn't necessarily more accurate anyway IMO, at least not worth the trade-off in reliability & wear and tear savings that a piston gun has over gas.

Having said all that I know I'm biased toward piston drive. Gas does have its advantages. Generally speaking gas impingement parts for ARs are easier to find and less expensive, though that has changed a lot over the past few years. If yours is gas, the infinite modularity of the AR allows you to to try a piston-driven AR simply bu buying a piston-driven upper receiver. Since they wprk independently of the lower receiver, you can alternate between both on the same lower receiver and see what you like best.
 

Schroedc

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And another one bites the dust . . . .

Never heard of Huldra before. Most of their AR's seem to be piston based on a quick reading vs direct impingement. Huldra claims to have a proprietary action (many manufacturer do). From their website:

Instead of directing the gases into the receiver, they go into a gas plug and drive rod sleeve. The gases are contained inside the drive rod sleeve and push the bolt carrier rearward using the gas pressure to cycle action.

Once the action is cycled the remaining gases are pushed out of the front of the gas block, purging the system and keeping the gases out of the face of the user and the receiver.

The end result is a firearm that functions and feels like an AR15 / M16 but burns cooler, cleaner, and is more reliable. The Huldra Mark IV has gone further than just a patented revolutionary operating system. All of the Adams Arms gas piston components are treated in today's most technologically advanced coating process on the market. The gas piston system and block are Melonited and the bolt carrier is ion bonded. All of the Piston System parts that operate this rifle come with a lifetime warranty.


IOW it's a piston drive. That's good. I own two Bushmasters and one DPMS Panther in 5.56/.223 which all use piston drive. I wouldn't own a gas impingement system unless I wanted to build an AR sniper rifle, and if I wanted to build an AR sniper rifle based on 5.56/.223 I would be an idiot anyway and would deserve what I ended up with. An overpriced under-performing 10 pound POS at least for a sniper rifle. Gas impingement isn't necessarily more accurate anyway IMO, at least not worth the trade-off in reliability & wear and tear savings that a piston gun has over gas.

Having said all that I know I'm biased toward piston drive. Gas does have its advantages. Generally speaking gas impingement parts for ARs are easier to find and less expensive, though that has changed a lot over the past few years. If yours is gas, the infinite modularity of the AR allows you to to try a piston-driven AR simply bu buying a piston-driven upper receiver. Since they wprk independently of the lower receiver, you can alternate between both on the same lower receiver and see what you like best.

Also for 320.00 with six magazines I can't hardly build one for that.....
 

Schroedc

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And my old model 70 meets my needs if I need to snipe
 

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How heavy is trigger pull? Most AR's are obnoxious in that respect... 7 1/2 lbs. is pretty much standard, and it sucks!! Replaced mine with a 3 lb. Timney, and the difference is unbelievable. Ordered a Velocity for a 22 magnum on AR platform project I have in mind. (I'd already have it if I hadn't started turning wood.) Supposed to be an excellent trigger for considerably less money. Worst I've heard anyone say about it is, "It isn't a Giesely or it isn't a Timney." It isn't $250 - $300 either.

Have a kid that works for us part time, I grew up with his dad. Kid decided he wanted to build an AR so him and Dad ordered everything to build them. Told his dad he needed to go ahead and replace the triggers while they were building them, and he gave me a dozen reasons why they shouldn't. He did a tour or two in the Navy, is in Law Enforcement, so he thought he knew AR's. I told him to come by the house and try mine; see what he thought; I'd buy the bullets. By the second shot, he was sold. Only took the kid one round. I let 'em burn up a magazine just to watch them smile, it got bigger with every round fired. Both of them were still grinning when they drove out the yard!! Dad with a slightly used Timney I'd caught a sweet deal on in hand; the kid ordered the Velocity.

http://www.groundzeroprecision.com/collections/upgrade-triggers

Velocity is sold out there at the moment, it'll cost you $10 more direct from VelocityTriggers.com.


Mine is a DPMS Lo Pro Classic, local shop had it for $520 at the time, I won a cheap over/under shotgun on a game of chance at the local tavern, that I wasn't even a little impressed with, and really had no use for, so I traded it in, new still in the box, never even unwrapped it, and covered 60% of the cost of the AR. Put a cheap Tasco scope on it, but it's amazingly accurate. Have since added an adjustable stock, quad rail with light, sling, a really nice hard side lockable case, dozen magazines. It's almost as addictive as wood working!
 
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brown down

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Mine is a DPMS Lo Pro Classic, local shop had it for $520 at the time, I won a cheap over/under shotgun on a game of chance at the local tavern, that I wasn't even a little impressed with, and really had no use for, so I traded it in, new still in the box, never even unwrapped it, and covered 60% of the cost of the AR. Put a cheap Tasco scope on it, but it's amazingly accurate. Have since added an adjustable stock, quad rail with light, sling, a really nice hard side lockable case, dozen magazines. It's almost as addictive as wood working!

I love my panther AR-10 but I to have to admit the trigger is to heavy! I took it up to the mountains when I cut burls down and let my buddy shoot it. he looked at me and said this thing has no kick at all with the biggest smile on his face! He is a bit jealous over that gun. The only thing that sucks is you can only get magazines from magpul or DPMS and they aren't cheap at all... $50 a pop :scare3: I def want to put a quad rail on it but thats gonna be down the road! have iron sites on it but I have a very good friend that is a sniper for the marine corps and he gets 50% off leupold another maker I never even heard of prob because their base line scope sells for around $1000 I got a hell of a deal on that rifle used but didn't even look like it was fired! I paid around $900 for it I think they go for around $1300 new
 

Kevin

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I haven't tested my DPMS - would you believe I've never bought a gauge?! I just have always either liked the feel of a pull or I haven't - if I do I buy if not I walk. My DPMS is a little stouter than the 2 Bushmasters but it's only barely noticeable and it has never affected my aim. I suck with all 3 lol. Actually I'm an okay shot for no more than I shoot. I suppose I should probably have them all 3 matched, but honestly I don't know why.

I think in general too much is made of trigger weight especially when you're talking about a rifle. Striker fired handguns maybe that's more reasonable of an argument, but even then, IMO 95% of gun owners aren't accurate enough with their weapons for a 4 lb pull to give them much more than very slightly better accuracy over a 6 lb pull. Now if you put two weapons in the hands of a sniper and the gap in pull weight is pretty large yes I think their paper will show a significant drop in accuracy if you hand them a off-the-rack 6 or 7 lb rifle when they've been shooting 2.5 lb. Common sense.

In my opinion, take-up and creep have far more influence on your accuracy than simply weight and again, within reason of course. Take my K31 Swiss. I'm pretty darned handy with it. Bad eyesight and all I can flat reach out and touch something consistently (although I have never been able to really stretch its legs like I want) but it took hundreds of rounds for me to really finally get used to the mile of take-up it has. It doesn't have any creep though and that makes it very easy to become accurate. The weight is ~3 lbs. which is the standard for K31's that came off the line. Most off-the-rack rifles are not made by the Swiss though so that number is unheard of in a stock military rifle and even worse USGI rifle has a wide variance in trigger creep. Also, the standard issue GP-11 Swiss ammo is considered nearly match grade, so me being pretty much a dead eye with it isn't due as much to me as it is owing to the fine craftsmanship inherent in Swiss engineering and manufacturing. I can't make the same groups with any of my much newer AR's with iron sights as I can with the K31. My point being weight alone doe not make the K31 so much more inherently accurate as does the full range of variables.

An unrelated issue is the design of the K31 trigger - it can be easily adjusted in the field - no need for an armorer since the Swiss army was trained how to be their own armorers for most everything relating to the K31, and the trigger design was made with that in mind. It is really an almost perfect design. In the US I wouldn't even be allowed to enter the CMP (civilian marksmanship program) with my K31 because unless they've changed it, 3.5 lb pull is the minimum allowed. In Switzerland it's 2.9 pounds so that stock, non-customized K31's could be entered allowing the average Swiss civilian shooter to play without having to spend money to an armorer if they didn't want to file the sears etc. themselves. Well here I have gone and done it again. I get to talking about my K31 and totally lose the original topic. What can I say it's a magical weapon.

Trigger weight? YES it can be important but I think it's overrated for the most part, at least in the way most weekend warriors speak of it without ever even mentioning other performance issues such as take-up or creep and I have always assumed most don't even consider it except unconsciously. Yes there's a big difference between 9 lb and 3 lbs but between 6 to 7 lbs and 4 to 5 lbs ehh ... not so much for the casual shooter as how much creep the trigger has. I'm not saying there's not marksman or snipers on this forum, but for most who read this their scorecard won't register much of a difference. Overall trigger performance is much more important than simply the pull weight alone.....


That's my opinion and I'm sticking to it.
 

Schroedc

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Interesting listening to everyone regarding trigger pull and accuracy. I have to agree that there are several factors that make a difference. My Ruger No. 1 has been dialed in, exactly how I like it and I can hit nice tight groups with it because that's exactly what I bought it for. My M1 Garand? totally different and it does just what it was designed to do. Hit a man sized target at 150 yards or less. Yes, you can get them to shoot really tight groups in a range situation but for me why bother, as long as I can hit the approximate middle of what I'm shooting it at I'm happy. The AR, I haven't had a chance to get it out and shoot it yet so not really sure what I think of the trigger yet, will it shoot teeny tiny groups right out of the box with an inexpensive red dot and cheap ammo? Probably not. Will it be enjoyable, do a decent job knocking over soup cans at 100 yards or less and in the case of the zombie apocalypse or the second civil war do it's job as a personal defense weapon? Probably. When I need precision I'll stick to my Model 70, either of the No. 1's I own or the Thompson contender carbine. Not trying to say accuracy isn't important but looking at the purpose that each specific rifle was made for I don't tend to obsess over pushing it beyond what it was designed for. If I want a hammer I'll by a hammer, If I want a maul I'll buy a maul.

Before anyone goes ape$hit over the above, I'm a tool for each job kind of guy and fun and reliability is more important than spending every waking moment tweaking and adjusting every single thing I own :sarcastic:
 

Kevin

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I'm a tool for each job kind of guy and fun and reliability is more important than spending every waking moment tweaking and adjusting every single thing I own :sarcastic:
Not trying to say accuracy isn't important but looking at the purpose that each specific rifle was made for I don't tend to obsess over pushing it beyond what it was designed for. If I want a hammer I'll by a hammer, If I want a maul I'll buy a maul.

I think that's exactly what I was saying as well, but just in a different way.

But I want to know about your Model 70. What's it chambered in and is it pre-64? Knowing you it is. I'll guess .30-06 because I know you love the cartridge (so do I).

:popcorn:
 

Schroedc

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I think that's exactly what I was saying as well, but just in a different way.

But I want to know about your Model 70. What's it chambered in and is it pre-64? Knowing you it is. I'll guess .30-06 because I know you love the cartridge (so do I).

:popcorn:

My model 70 is chambered in 30-06, It isn't pre-64 (SN puts it about 71) but it does a damn fine job.
 
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