Dismiss Notice
Woodbarter has upgraded to HTTPS. Please see click here for all the details.

Box Joints?

Discussion in 'Box Makers' started by Bigg081, Jan 23, 2019.

  1. Bigg081

    Bigg081 Connoisseur of Man Glitter Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    234
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    First name:
    Shane
    Box joint jig gets here tomorrow but I haven’t been in the shop in a week. Damn thumb is keeping me down. I’m about to go nuts!
    I made an attempt at miter joints with a scrap piece. I used @Mike1950 ’s method with the miter saw. It’s not perfect but was some good clamp pressure and a tiny bit of sanding I don’t think anyone would ever notice. 2EA6E356-07CD-4BC5-9D5D-A2697FF7A37B.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 4
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  2. Mike1950

    Mike1950 Founding Member Founding Member Full Member

    Messages:
    22,186
    Likes Received:
    6,629
    Location:
    Eastern Washington
    First name:
    Mike
    Not bad and tolerance for error on something that small with that thick of wood is almost zero. Making boxes is about eye appeal. someone- I thing @Sprung mentioned thickness of wood needs to be proportional to box. Watch out though- falling into box vortex is almost as bad as lathe vortex-just one hell of a lot less chips. Lots of stuff in classroom on boxes.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. Ray D

    Ray D Member Full Member

    Messages:
    1,077
    Likes Received:
    352
    Location:
    Lutz, Florida
    First name:
    Ray
    Looks good. Check out the Merle band clamps. I like them a lot for boxes and picture frames.
     
  4. Gdurfey

    Gdurfey Member Full Member

    Messages:
    903
    Likes Received:
    517
    Location:
    Falcon, CO
    First name:
    Garry
    tried to do a picture frame from barn wood for a Christmas present...........like all the previous comments, I will be looking for better ways to remove the slop. ugh........thought I was so close until assembly time.
     
  5. FranklinWorkshops

    FranklinWorkshops Member Full Member

    Messages:
    2,452
    Likes Received:
    1,187
    Location:
    Landenberg, PA, USA
    First name:
    Larry
    Garry, barnwood is supposed to have cracks. You're too tough on yourself. It's character that people pay extra to get.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Funny Funny x 1
  6. Bigg081

    Bigg081 Connoisseur of Man Glitter Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    234
    Location:
    Cleveland, Ohio
    First name:
    Shane
    Thanks @Mike1950 I figure 1/2" thickness works for a big range of different size boxes.
    I have some really nice flat pieces that I got from Scott Satterfield (not sure his screen name) years ago. Some Goncalo Alves with a really pretty continuous grain that I hope to make a nice box with. Fingers crossed I will wrap the grain around the box correctly. I need to get some more Goncalo Alves to use for the top and bottom. Not really sure about any other woods that would look really well....maybe Wenge.
    I haven't looked into the classroom area yet. Thanks for the heads-up.

    I have a Bessey Strap clamp. I think it will work too.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Schroedc

    Schroedc Trying to kick a nasy sawdust habbit.... Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

    Messages:
    10,316
    Likes Received:
    6,303
    Location:
    Rushford MN
    First name:
    Colin
    I like to do Mitre joints on my table saw. Invest in a Wixley digital angle gauge. between that and using a framing square to set up my crosscut sled I get perfect fit almost every time.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Alex Beck

    Alex Beck Member Full Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    Florida
    First name:
    Alex
    Miters look nice but are weak due to the end grain glue surface, they need to be reinforced w/ splines which looks nice as well. Miters are also a pain to glue up. The best/most accurate way to cut a miter is on dedicated sled on your tablesaw. If you have a good quality chop saw thats properly aligned, that can work as well but always cut the material standing up on the edge grain. The blade seems to wander more if you try to cut it laying on the face grain. A shooting board is the best way to trim & adjust the miter joint. I'll also make the argument that box joints and dovetails are very close it in strength, box joints have more glue surface area and a dovetail has a bit more resistance to tension. A dovetail is harder to cut without gaps whereas a box joint is fairly easy to cut with the right jig. A dado blade will make it quicker as well.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
Current Time: 1:20 PM