Dismiss Notice
Woodbarter has upgraded to HTTPS. Please see click here for all the details.

Briar harvesting

Discussion in 'Logging' started by ChrisK, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    Here it is after a looong delay:
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Way Cool Way Cool x 2
  2. barry richardson

    barry richardson Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

    Messages:
    8,075
    Likes Received:
    2,853
    Location:
    Buckeye AZ
    First name:
    Barry
    Very nice Chris, thanks for posting. Are the burls buried in dirt during the curing process?
     
  3. Treecycle Hardwoods

    Treecycle Hardwoods Founding Member Founding Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,218
    Likes Received:
    1,103
    Location:
    West Bend WI 53090
    First name:
    Greg
    Really cool Chris! Thanks for sharing!
     
  4. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    Yes Barry,
    Buried below ground and often watered down. The reason the stumps are buried underground is that soil retains moisture.
    But the same process can be replicated indoors with the stumps buried under a haycock. I've seen this in a pipemaker factory.
    The reason is to keep the wood wet till it's boiled.

    PS: sorry for my poor English guys...
     
  5. Treecycle Hardwoods

    Treecycle Hardwoods Founding Member Founding Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,218
    Likes Received:
    1,103
    Location:
    West Bend WI 53090
    First name:
    Greg
    I understood your explaination well Chris no need to be sorry.
     
  6. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    OK then... time to apply for the green card:drinks3:
     
    • Funny Funny x 8
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Molokai

    Molokai Knife Maker Full Member

    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    969
    Location:
    Croatia
    First name:
    Tomislav
    Thx for posting. I enjoyed watching the video.
     
  8. ironman123

    ironman123 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,528
    Likes Received:
    669
    Location:
    Texas
    First name:
    Ray
    Christos that was a very interesting video. Do you not use the trunk wood for anything?
     
  9. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    Personnally I don't use the trunk wood. But I know some people are using it for canes' handles.
     
  10. ironman123

    ironman123 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,528
    Likes Received:
    669
    Location:
    Texas
    First name:
    Ray
    That was my thought, canes. I heard that briar wood was good for canes. Thanks
     
  11. NYWoodturner

    NYWoodturner Wood Spinner Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

    Messages:
    9,251
    Likes Received:
    2,484
    Location:
    Orange County New York
    First name:
    Scott
    Great video Chris! Makes me curious how many thumbs are lost annually in the burl harvesting industry though :scare3: :sarcastic:
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
  12. HomeBody

    HomeBody Member Full Member

    Messages:
    1,644
    Likes Received:
    658
    Location:
    Findlay, IL
    First name:
    Gary
    Does briar grow anywhere in the USA? Has anyone tried to grow it here?
    What is the purpose of boiling the stumps? Thanks for your video. Gary
     
  13. gman2431

    gman2431 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,485
    Likes Received:
    1,755
    Location:
    Michigan
    First name:
    cody
    That was some serious axe work!

    Made me cringe a couple times during the video!
     
  14. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    I don't know for the entire industry. As for the guy on the video I don't worry that much for he has more than 30 years experience.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    As far as I know, briar is a bush growing around the Mediterranean bassin.
    The reason of boiling briar is to stabilize a wood which otherwise has a strong tendency for cracking. After the wood has been boiled, some time (from 3 months to one year and even more depending on size) is needed for the wood to dry.
    As you can see on the video, the boiling water is of a dark red color, produced by the red suc extracted during the boiling process.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. Kevin

    Kevin Wood is good. Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Founding Member Full Member

    Messages:
    30,921
    Likes Received:
    8,313
    Location:
    Texas
    First name:
    Kevin
    I thought he was never going to stop chopping that burl until it was gone. Cool video thanks for letting us see that Chris.
     
  17. Aurora North

    Aurora North Member Full Member

    Messages:
    479
    Likes Received:
    144
    Location:
    New York/ New Jersey
    First name:
    Yusuke
    Awesome video Chris. Have to say I was expecting the guy to lose a finger or lay right into his hand at any moment. Looked like a job for a small carving chainsaw.
     
  18. ChrisK

    ChrisK Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    383
    Likes Received:
    190
    Location:
    Brussels, Belgium
    First name:
    Christos
    If you watch the video from 3.22' to 3.25', you'll see the friend showing some defects on the stump. Further on, he's continuously chopping till all these defects are cleaned. That's the way it is with briar: the area forming the pith from the roots to the branches and around develop a lot of defects, rotten parts... that have to be cleaned.

    The other option is to pay for defects (since weight is the selling unit...) and put the wood aside for firewood or casting (if we ever could have Alumilite resin at an affordable price here...). The pics below demonstrate what happens when these defects aren't cleaned right after the wood has been cut.

    After a stump has been heavily cleaned... it needs some more...
    2014-11-05 12.00.20.jpg

    Another slice...
    2014-11-05 12.00.37.jpg

    ... needs some more cleaning...
    2014-11-05 12.00.47.jpg

    ... another attempt...
    2014-11-05 12.00.58.jpg

    Conclusion: firewood (after I took some pics).
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2014
Current Time: 6:55 PM