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Chainsaw sawmilling

Karl_TN

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@woodtickgreg, Someday I hope to get a s Super Jolly Grinder with hydraulics (they make the Oregon grinders but are slightly cheaper). Just wondering how do you grind the rakers down to a consistent height because I despise filing them by hand? Have you tried CBN or diamond grinding wheels on your chainsaw grinder yet?

Also, do you let everything air dry or do you own a kiln to speed up the drying process so you don’t have wood piles taking up room drying for years with those thicker boards? (Edit: just noticed Dan beat me to this question).
 
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woodtickgreg

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Do you have a kiln or just air dry your lumber before using it?
I air dry all of my lumber, no room for a kiln living in the city. I sticker and stack lumber in my garage for drying, fans when I first stack it to dry the surface of the wood, then just time and the heat of the garage does the rest.
 

woodtickgreg

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@woodtickgreg, Someday I hope to get a s Super Jolly Grinder with hydraulics (they make the Oregon grinders but are slightly cheaper). Just wondering how do you grind the rakers down to a consistent height because I despise filing them by hand? Have you tried CBN or diamond grinding wheels on your chainsaw grinder yet?

Also, do you let everything air dry or do you own a kiln to speed up the drying process so you don’t have wood piles taking up room drying for years with those thicker boards? (Edit: just noticed Dan beat me to this question).
I use a raker depth gage to set the grinder stop up to the correct height. I did a thread on this somewhere here a long time ago. I'll see if I can find it and post a link. I have not stepped up o CB or diamond wheels yet as I stil have several of the standard pink grinding wheels that I use. They work fine for me and I like that I can dress them to whatever shape I want.
 
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woodtickgreg

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woodtickgreg

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Here's a link for a thread I did on sharpening and setting the rakers.
 

djg

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I air dry all of my lumber, no room for a kiln living in the city. I sticker and stack lumber in my garage for drying, fans when I first stack it to dry the surface of the wood, then just time and the heat of the garage does the rest.
So you don't get your lumber down to the recommended 8-10% MC before using it, but only to the 12-15% MC Air drying can achieve? My numbers may be off, but I think you get my idea. The reason I ask is I have several shelves of AD lumber in the basement waiting for me to get off my butt and build a kiln. Can't use it that wet?
 

woodtickgreg

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So you don't get your lumber down to the recommended 8-10% MC before using it, but only to the 12-15% MC Air drying can achieve? My numbers may be off, but I think you get my idea. The reason I ask is I have several shelves of AD lumber in the basement waiting for me to get off my butt and build a kiln. Can't use it that wet?
Honestly I think people get to hung up on moisture percentage numbers. My lumber is air dried to the relative humidity of my area and very stable. I have never had any problems using my lumber for indoor furniture. Remember lumber is hydroscopic, meaning it is constantly absorbing and releasing moister. You can kiln it and get it as dry as you want, lower than the humidity of your area, but once it's out of the kiln it's going to absorb moisture from the air and the percentage point is going to go up. When people have a failure of a project they have built it's usually because they did not allow for the movement that naturally occurs in all wood from season changes in humidity. Not because the wood wasnt dried to the magic 10% or whatever number. I cut my lumber thick because it will shrink as it dries, and it will also loose weight as the moisture is released. I also think air dried lumber is easier to work with, not as brittle or splintery.
Now one good thing about a kiln is being able to get the temps of the wood up and hot enough to kill bugs, but I've never really ha a big issue with that either. If the log is really buggie I pass on it and move on to better logs.
 

djg

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For those following this thread, here’s a link to a place with Super Jolly hydraulic grinder for $330:

https://maverickmowersupply.com/700010-chain-grinder-super-jolly-w-hydraulic-clamp

Exactly the same as the high end Oregon 620 grinder (both made by Tecomec), but $125 cheaper.
Wow, that's still a little too pricey for a weekend warrior like me. I know it's been covered before, so I'll just do a search, but I would like to get a reliable low end sharpener some day.
 

woodtickgreg

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Wow, that's still a little too pricey for a weekend warrior like me. I know it's been covered before, so I'll just do a search, but I would like to get a reliable low end sharpener some day.
I have a more basic Oregon grinder, still professional, way cheaper, and what a lot of small engine shops still use to sharpen chains for their customers. Just stay away from the harbor freight grinders in my opinion.
 

vegas urban lumber

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i have one of those and it works really well. i could never get a sharp chain by hand, but with that grinder resharpened chains cut better than when fresh out of the package
 
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