Cherry burl dye

The100road

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I don’t think I’ve tried cherry burl. I’d image that it wouldn’t take color very well. Most of the cherry burl I have is pretty dense.
 

JerseyHighlander

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Has anyone tried to dye cherry burl either single or double dye? What were the results?

I know it's not what you asked but. Leave it outside in the direct sun for a few days, or more, and you'll have all the color you want. Prior to finishing is best but depending on the finish, it can work afterwards too.
 

Rustburger

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I had noticed that no one seems to dye cherry burl but that might be for a very good reason. I have tried using black and that sorta accents the grain but not a lot more.
If I try another color, I will post some pics.
 

Sprung

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I did a couple pieces, but only because someone was adamant I dye their burl pieces for them. It turned out just as I expected it would - it looked like crud. It's dense enough that it won't absorb much resin, thus won't take on much color.

That job was the last time I ever dyed someone's own blanks for them. What many don't realize is that if you want to dye your blanks, wood selection is a HUGE part of the process. Woods light in color that will take on a lot of resin are what you want for dyeing and you're not changing the color of the wood, but rather adding to it - so darker woods, or denser woods that won't take on much resin are out.

Boxelder Burl, Horse Chestnut Burl, and Buckeye Burl were my favorites to dye. Curly/figured versions of the same woods were also good.
 

Rustburger

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I did a couple pieces, but only because someone was adamant I dye their burl pieces for them. It turned out just as I expected it would - it looked like crud. It's dense enough that it won't absorb much resin, thus won't take on much color.

That job was the last time I ever dyed someone's own blanks for them. What many don't realize is that if you want to dye your blanks, wood selection is a HUGE part of the process. Woods light in color that will take on a lot of resin are what you want for dyeing and you're not changing the color of the wood, but rather adding to it - so darker woods, or denser woods that won't take on much resin are out.

Boxelder Burl, Horse Chestnut Burl, and Buckeye Burl were my favorites to dye. Curly/figured versions of the same woods were also good.
Yeah, when I used black it only gave the wood an aged look.
 
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