Cutting board, face or edge grain?

wombat

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Okay, so I know an end grain board is the best, but it's out of my league.

My question is ...... Is it worth the effort to do an edge grain board, in terms of longevity and minimal damage, or is the knife damage about the same as an easier to make face grain board??
 

T. Ben

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I made walnut and cherry face grain one for my wife about a year ago and while you can see some cut marks in it,not bad though. I would say it's held up pretty well.
 

Tom Smart

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Face and edge grain will wear the same. You are essentially cutting the long fibers. With end grain your knife will go between the fibers, there is nothing to cut so they don’t show damage like long grain will.

Why do you think an end grain board is out of your depth? If you make a long grain board you are mostly there. Just just cross cut it, the pieces being the thickness of the final board you want. Then turn the pieces 90 degrees and one more glue up. Not that much more to it than that, unless you are after some kind of pattern.
 

Tony

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A edge grain or long grain (same thing) board is plenty strong enough IMO. I've been making them for about 15 years and they hold up just fine for me.
 

wombat

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Face and edge grain will wear the same. You are essentially cutting the long fibers. With end grain your knife will go between the fibers, there is nothing to cut so they don’t show damage like long grain will.

Why do you think an end grain board is out of your depth? If you make a long grain board you are mostly there. Just just cross cut it, the pieces being the thickness of the final board you want. Then turn the pieces 90 degrees and one more glue up. Not that much more to it than that, unless you are after some kind of pattern.
With limited tools. i.e. a circular saw and orbital sander, I'm just not game to take on that much end grain by hand!!
 
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