Delta 2 HP Radial Arm Saw

cbbowmanjr

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As the title suggests, I have a Delta radial saw for sale. Model 438 02 314 2067. 2 hp, 230 volt, single phase, 9.6 amps, compound miter, 24" outward travel.

I bought this new if you can believe it. It hasn’t gotten much use, and is in my way.

With all the compound miter saws out there, a radial arm saw seems kind of obsolete. However, I would like to see it get some use, if there’s someone out there who would like to make an offer. I’d also consider interesting trades.

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Gdurfey

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Bruce, this site has had quite a few discussions about Radial Arm saws and there is a following. Matter of fact, a few guys do great restoration jobs on old, good tools.

Best wishes, but I bet it will at least generate other comments.
 

cbbowmanjr

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Sorry, so many details I didn’t list. I’ve hardly used it, and no restoration would be required. It has either a 10” or a 12” blade…need to find more details in the manual and will get back on here to provide them, likely after Thanksgiving.
 
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Sprung

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With all the compound miter saws out there, a radial arm saw seems kind of obsolete.

I've seen a lot of people ditch their radial arm saws in favor of a compound miter saw. I went the opposite way. I ditched my compound miter saw and restored a 1950's Dewalt MBF. I haven't yet regretted it.

Hope you find a good home for yours - it looks in great shape. I'd make an offer, but you're too far away and I have zero space for a second radial arm saw in my shop. As it is, I'm now trying to figure out where I'm going to put another lathe next week...
 

Greenacres2

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Agree with @Sprung , added a 1957 Dewalt GWI. But kept the miter for construction. Waiting for my retirement is my Dad’s 1946 Red Star, the predecessor of the Delta. Great saw, but needs some love.
Right blades are a must, but Bruce’s saw is a very nice one!!
 

woodtickgreg

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That's a great saw! If I had the room in my shop I'd be having a road trip. My vintage dewalt fits in my shop so that's what I'm staying with. But man to have that crosscut capacity!
 

Sprung

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Y’all are trying to talk me into re-integrating this into my work!

In reality, that probably depends on the type of work you do in the shop. Building furniture? Yeah, I'd probably look at keeping it. Especially when you look at its crosscut capacity, ability to cut angles well, put dado blade on it, etc. Doing a lot of turning? In a shop focused mainly on turning, it really is likely to just be another horizontal surface that collects stuff. Doing carpentry/trim work/home remodeling/etc. - well, the compound miter saw is probably the better choice for that.

If you're not really using it, and have hardly used it in your ownership of it, then you probably already know that it might not be the right tool for you. If we're giving you second thoughts, then maybe give it a few months of effort to try and incorporate it into your woodworking and reevaluate if it's a tool you'd like to keep, or still want to move on to a new home. I think of something my dad has said - "Better to have a tool and not need it, than not have it and need it." The times he's made that comment to me were usually when I was thinking of selling something - for example, my late 1930's 24" Craftsman scroll saw that I did a complete tear down restoration on. In the 4-ish years since I finished that restoration, I think I have used it maybe twice. (Which might be my sign to realize that this is a tool I could realistically find a new home for...)

If no interest in a buyer here, the folks at OWWM.org certainly also appreciate some vintage, American made machinery.
 

2feathers Creative Making

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Y’all are trying to talk me into re-integrating this into my work!
If you want to trade, I know a guy that has quite a bit of wood to trade. I still haven't seen a price to base from. The last used radial I bought was supposed to have electronic adjustment but really was an acquaintance dumping something he didn't feel like fixing. I think I gave him 150 and regretted the 1 after I got it home... Still haven't rebuilt it.
 

cbbowmanjr

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It’s really hard for me to say what it’s really worth! Other than cleaning a couple dirt dauber nests off it, it’s ready to go. I’ve used it so little, it still has the original blade on it.

It isn’t the electronic version…manual all the way.

Sorry to “post and regret,” but I may rethink selling this thing…will keep all posted
 
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Gdurfey

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It’s really hard for me to say what it’s really worth! Other than cleaning a couple dirt dauber nests off it, it’s ready to go. I’ve used it so little, it still has the original blade on it.

It isn’t the electronic version…manual all the way.

Sorry to “post and regret,” but I may rethink selling this thing…will keep all posted
Bruce, my original comment was not meant to send you down a path of what ifs and second guessing. This community is amazing and I just wanted to be encouraging to let you know folks do desire good American iron.

Happy thanksgiving
 
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