Dozuki saw recommendation

DLJeffs

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I need a dozuki style saw as part of building my own guitar. I've been searching on line and have figured out a few things but other things got me more confused. I know I want one with at least an 8 inch blade - anything shorter forces you to make lots of short choppy strokes rather than a few long full strokes. Pretty sure I want one with a back spline for strength. I know it restricts the ability to make a flush cut wider than the width of the blade but I can accept that. Then I get confused. Some web sites say all the different type of saws work well for crosscut as well as ripping. Other say not. Some reviews complain about busting teeth easily. And is the replaceable blade style good or bad - does the blade stay solid and tight or get all wobbly, etc. I understand you can't sharpen these blades or at least you need to be a specialist to sharpen them.

So I'm looking for advice on a Japanese style saw for general use. Also looking for recommendations where to buy it from.
Thanks,
Doug
 
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ScoutDog

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Hi Doug:

I appreciate the search for an accurate, effective saw for work that requires sufficient precision to get it right the first time. After shopping online and looking at many kinds of reviews, I went with the SUIZAN pull saw, 9.5" replaceable, double-sided blade (cross cut one side, rip on the other), long rattan handle, thin kerf, etc., from Amazon for ~$38. Honestly, I could not tell the difference online between that one and ~$24 versions, but I decided my projects and precise cuts are worth it. This was over the summer, and I have not regretted it one iota! Happy to elaborate. Hope this helps!

in Amazon search engine, type: SUIZAN Japanese Pull Saw Hand Saw 9.5 Inch Ryoba Double Edge for Woodworking
 

trc65

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I don't have a dozuki, but I do have a royoba double edged saw made by Suizan that I got from Amazon. I don't remember who, but someone recommended that brand to me. I feel your pain as I often get paralysis by analysis.

Many (all?) of the lower to moderate priced saws are impulse hardened, and can't be sharpened. Even on saws that can be sharpened, it is usually easier to just replace the blade. Make sure whatever saw you buy has easily obtainable replacement blades.

Eventually, a tooth or two will probably break off, but missing one or two won't affect performance. When it gets really dull or unusable, just replace the blade.

When looking for a saw, it seemed to me the difference in price was often how fancy the handle was constructed. For that reason, I chose one that had the tooth count I wanted with a cheap plastic handle. The replacement blades seem to be the same (within a brand) regardless of the handle style, so I decided not to spend more for a handle. Others may want to...

To summarize, pick a brand with good reviews, decide on blade style/size, tooth count, and then decide how nice a handle you want.
 
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Arn213

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This is for fret slotting? You need to know the fret-wire tang width you will be using. They are usually .023”. That information is critical to precisely determine the kerf of the fret saw blade that you need.

You know there is another way to do this............
 

woodtickgreg

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I've been happy with the ones I've purchased from wood craft. I have one with a spine and one without.
 

DLJeffs

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This is for fret slotting? You need to know the fret-wire tang width you will be using. They are usually .023”. That information is critical to precisely determine the kerf of the fret saw blade that you need.

You know there is another way to do this............
Thanks Arn. Yes, my coach told me about cutting the fret slots and the kerf width. He has a saw specifically for that. We're going to get a finger board - not worth the effort and time to make my own. But there are other uses and I do other projects where a precision saw would be helpful, so I figured I get one that I can use for multiple tasks.
 
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