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Electric chain saw sharpeners

Discussion in 'Logging' started by Digginestdog, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Anyone have experience with electric chain saw sharpeners? I've been sharpening my chains manually, with a jig, but it's taking soooooo long, I need to find a faster way. Granberg makes a few that had favorable reviews, but I'd like to hear your comments. Thanks, and I hope I'm in the right place for this question?
     
  2. Bigdrowdy1

    Bigdrowdy1 Member Full Member

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  3. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    I’ve used a Dremel a few times when I’ve hit something and really chewed up a chain... otherwise, I file.

    I’ve always wondered about the timberline sharpeners. Not electric, but it looks slick and easy.
     
  4. barry richardson

    barry richardson Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    I have a dremel attachment, and an Oregon sharpener, which is basically a one-trick dremel. They work OK in a pinch, but dont make it as sharp as a professional sharpener does.
     
  5. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Thanks guys. I'll look at those.
     
  6. David Van Asperen

    David Van Asperen Member Full Member

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    I have a cheap harbor freight unit that my father in law bought me it works well But would look at similar ones that do not use the hand grip ( like a bike hand brake) to hold the chain in place while bringing the sharpening blade down to sharpe the cutter. The hand grip tends to tip the chain and you get a uneven cut on the chain links when they are not all the same the chain tends to cut in an arc and not straight. I will get the name of the better sharpener from my father in law if you want it uses a wing nut to tighten the chain in place. I believe the better one was under $100 and the harbor freight one about &50
     
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  7. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Thanks David. I'm interested.
     
  8. woodtickgreg

    woodtickgreg scroll, flat, spin Staff Member Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    I hand file most of the time, usually do about 4 or 5 sharpening and then I use my Oregon grinder to grind all the teeth to the same size. Grinders can be usefull if you know how to use one. Mine was about $350 ish new, it is the same one that most power equipment shops use to sharpen chains for customers. Northern tool sells them reasonably priced.
    Here's a link to a thread I did a very long time ago. It may show my grinder.
    https://woodbarter.com/threads/chain-rakers-and-how-to-set-them.13341/
     
  9. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Hi Greg, thanks for the info. I checked out the thread on your grinder. I think it is one of the better ones. I've spent the last few hours researching and, found, like you, a lot of people still hand file. I'm not sure I can justify the good grinder just yet, but your method of basically dressing the cutters after 4 or 5 hand filings seems the way to go.
     
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  10. David Van Asperen

    David Van Asperen Member Full Member

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    @woodtickgreg just went to that link and all good info presented in a manner that I can understand lots of pictures fully show what you are explaining. Thanks for sharing your fantastic info
    Dave
     
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  11. woodtickgreg

    woodtickgreg scroll, flat, spin Staff Member Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    I have found that in tools you often get what you pay for. Watch ebay for one of the Oregon grinders used, if your patient you'll score one. The one I have is a professional grinder, I have had it probably for 20 years or so. Every small engine shop I have worked in has had this same grinder there for sharpening chains. I have a friend that cuts firewood, he saves all his dull chains and he'll give me like 20 of them to sharpen at a time, the grinder makes quick work of that. It also allows me to custom grind chains for milling.
     
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  12. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Last edited: Feb 4, 2018
  13. woodtickgreg

    woodtickgreg scroll, flat, spin Staff Member Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    Yes that is a valuable skill to learn, do it enough and you will develop a muscle memory for it. I can usually hand file a chain in less time than it takes to remove a chain from a saw, grind it, and reinstall it. I can do it in the field, but if you can clamp the bar of the saw in a vice it makes it much easier. Mount a vise to a towing hitch reciever and then you will always have one in the field. It's useful for other things as well.
     
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  14. David Van Asperen

    David Van Asperen Member Full Member

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    @woodtickgreg
    Greg, what is the model number on your grinder. I checked a bit and there are a couple that say pro so just wondering. Thanks in advance for your valued opinion and info
    Dave
     
  15. Digginestdog

    Digginestdog Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Sorry, Greg, I meant to address that to you. I still don't have the hang of how these posts work.
     
  16. woodtickgreg

    woodtickgreg scroll, flat, spin Staff Member Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    Heck I don't know, lol. It's out in the cold garage, next time I'm out there I'll take a look.
    This is probably the equivalent version Of what I have, this is the newer model but still has all of the adjustments.
    Oregon 520-120 Bench Saw Chain Grinder


    [​IMG]
     
  17. woodtickgreg

    woodtickgreg scroll, flat, spin Staff Member Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  18. David Van Asperen

    David Van Asperen Member Full Member

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    @woodtickgreg , thanks Gregthat is good enough for me ,do not go out . They have probably changed model numbers anyway
    Thanks again
    Dave
     
  19. Woodworking Vet

    Woodworking Vet Member Full Member

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    I tried a lot of electric chainsaw sharpeners (from neighbors, Amazon and so on). I finally got this and can't say enough good things about it. So easy to use, replacement burrs are inexpensive and I can sharpen in the field or at home with an 110v adapter. I never hesitate to sharpen anymore.
     
  20. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    electric chainsaw sharpeners, work on gas powered saw chains too....

    I agree with Woodtick for the most part. The one thing many forget is that the grinding wheel can super heat the chisel (cutter), and take the temper out of the steel or harden it so that the hand file doesn't work well.

    I simply use the electric chain sharpener to balance my chains after 5-10 hand sharpenings. I also use it to adjust the rakers and lower safety links in green rated chains.

    I've used stump vises to hold the chain bar in the woods, but broke some using hardwood stumps. I found hemlock stumps work well and have minimal sap issues.
     
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