First time using rattle can

Brandon Sloan

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First timer here, using Varathane Clear Gloss Oil-Based Spar Urethane Spray. It was the only thing they had at the grocery store which is where I was at when I decided I wanted to spray something.

I started with a sample piece... no I didn’t. But I did watch a bunch of YouTube videos.... I’m lying. I just grabbed a bowl off the shelf and decided to go for it.

First coat went on per the instructions, or per my interpretation of 10 to 12 inches away and light misting sprays that slightly overlap. I noticed a little popcorn effect and after an internal battle I resisted touching it.

Here’s some close up pictures, I think the grain is pretty cool looking. I’ll update as I build up coats, probably do 12 or maybe 20 or maybe 5, we’ll have to see.

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T. Ben

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I’ve sprayed a few things with Krylon triple thick glaze,one thing I’ve had happen is,there are spots that soaks it in and won’t let it build up.
 

FranklinWorkshops

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That's a beautiful bowl. I often use Varathane products and have good experience but sometimes need to use shellac as a sealer to avoid blotching with woods that have non-uniform absorption problems. Cherry is notorious for that but a "sanding/sealer" wash coat of shellac works wonders.
 

barry richardson

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Looking good Brandon, rattle can poly is my go to finish these days. It has been a long evolution and I have tried about everything on the way. I like to start with a couple of coats of wipe-on poly, rub it out with a 600 grit sanding sponge when it dries, then spray (I like Minwax Fast Drying Poly) in semi gloss, one coat is all that is needed. End up with a very professional, and durable finish...
 

Brandon Sloan

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Thanks for the comments, I lightly sanded the piece last night before bed. The spray was still a little sticky and I ended up with swirls in the first layer of finish. I guess I was tired because I thought the solution would be to just spray a little heavier 2nd coat. Something tells me I’ll be starting over. I’ll post some pictures when I go check on it.
 

FranklinWorkshops

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Thanks for the comments, I lightly sanded the piece last night before bed. The spray was still a little sticky and I ended up with swirls in the first layer of finish. I guess I was tired because I thought the solution would be to just spray a little heavier 2nd coat. Something tells me I’ll be starting over. I’ll post some pictures when I go check on it.
When a finish doesn't dry as expected, it may be the age of the product causing the problem. Does the can have a "use by" date?
 

Brandon Sloan

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When a finish doesn't dry as expected, it may be the age of the product causing the problem. Does the can have a "use by" date?
I went outside to check on it and it was still sticky. I would think it would be dry after leaving it for 14 hours. The can didn’t have a “use by” date. It says it will be dry to the touch after 2 hours and fully cured after 4 hours. I think you are right, it was the last can on the shelf at a grocery store.

I sanded it back down to bare wood. I’m going to go to the hardware store and try a can of lacquer. The speed stik sand paper cleaner paid for itself again today. I would of ran out of sanding disks without it. I’ll try to get a few coats laid down today and post some updated pictures.
 

FranklinWorkshops

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Before using the lacquer, I suggest a light coat of shellac as a sealer. No matter how great a job the sandpaper appears to have done, there will be residue down in the pores that need to be sealed in. The lacquer will stick to the shellac.
 

Brandon Sloan

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Switched to a smaller piece, in case I have to start over. I really like this little piece of wood. It is turned thin but still feels solid. I was trying to get the rim to pick up some movement by turning it as thin as I could. Currently we have 1 coat of shellac and 4 coats of lacquer.

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Brandon Sloan

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I’m done with the piece and will post it in finished projects.

Here’s what I learned:
“Don’t touch, don’t touch, why the hell did you touch it.” It’s hard to resist the urge to fix a run or wipe away some excess. Just trust me on this, don’t touch it. Once it dries, it is much easier to deal with these issues, and sometimes they self fix. If you think it’s dry, give it a little more time. I picked it up and it felt dry, I took a paper towel to rub/buff it. Gripping the piece tight enough to hold it while buffing it caused my fingerprints to get embedded in the finish. Bottom line, DON’T TOUCH.
Very light coats! I knew the point was to build up coats, yet I still thought it was a good idea to make it look wet during each coat. I had to do a lot of work in between coats that probably wouldn’t be necessary with lighter coats.
Spraying curves is a challenge. You have to approach the piece at different angles without getting too much overspray on areas you already sprayed.
DON’T turn the lathe on to the lowest speed possible (for me 50rpm) and just spray. I know, what was I thinking?

Hope this helps someone in the future.
 

Barb

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I’m done with the piece and will post it in finished projects.

Here’s what I learned:
“Don’t touch, don’t touch, why the hell did you touch it.” It’s hard to resist the urge to fix a run or wipe away some excess. Just trust me on this, don’t touch it. Once it dries, it is much easier to deal with these issues, and sometimes they self fix. If you think it’s dry, give it a little more time. I picked it up and it felt dry, I took a paper towel to rub/buff it. Gripping the piece tight enough to hold it while buffing it caused my fingerprints to get embedded in the finish. Bottom line, DON’T TOUCH.
Very light coats! I knew the point was to build up coats, yet I still thought it was a good idea to make it look wet during each coat. I had to do a lot of work in between coats that probably wouldn’t be necessary with lighter coats.
Spraying curves is a challenge. You have to approach the piece at different angles without getting too much overspray on areas you already sprayed.
DON’T turn the lathe on to the lowest speed possible (for me 50rpm) and just spray. I know, what was I thinking?

Hope this helps someone in the future.
I know it wasn't funny while it was happening but I wanted to say what a joy it was to read as I kept chuckling. I can honestly see myself doing all of this which is why I needed to explain why I'm laughing rather than using the laugh emoji.
 

Brandon Sloan

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I know it wasn't funny while it was happening but I wanted to say what a joy it was to read as I kept chuckling. I can honestly see myself doing all of this which is why I needed to explain why I'm laughing rather than using the laugh emoji.
I‘m glad that you can relate. I’m guilty of ignoring the practical side of my mind too often. I’m trying to change the way I look at things. In the past I’ve been guilty of worrying too much about each piece that goes on the lathe. It was taking the fun out of things. So now I try to convince myself that it’s just wood and treat every awesome find like it won’t be my last.
 
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