Grizzly G0815 15" planer

woodtickgreg

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Looks nice, Greg! Well done!

In the pictures it looks like it may tend to be unstable (tippy) end to end if feeding a large, long heavy board thought it. The weight of the planer itself & cart may mitigate this, although the majority of the weight is placed for a very high center of gravity.

When feeding the test board thru were there any feelings of it being tippy?
No, it feels very stable and well planted, it's not wiggly at all, and it was a short board only about 3 feet long. Snipe is just part of planing in my opinion. On this machine I only get it on the exit side. The dewalt gave it on both ends. I've just gotten used to allowing 3" on both ends of a board for snipe and then just cutting it off.
 

TimR

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Glad all went well getting it downstairs and unloaded. I couldn’t help but think of a shirt I was given years ago, “To a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail !” Good looking machine!
I’m curious about the snipe. I don’t do a lot of planing with my Makita 2012NB but seems like I only got snipe if board doesn’t make good full level contact with both infeed and outfeed tables as well as main table. Beefy as that Grizzly looks, any way you can at least get a nice level outfeed table to see effect? Worst case…cut the ends as you’ve been doing.
 

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Yeah it's kind of weird that it gets the snipe on the outfeed end of the board, especially since it wasn't a long board. I've got some long boards to do and we'll see if having an outfeed support roller might reduce the snipe. Part of it may be that the infeed roller is metal and the outfeed is rubber.
 

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Yeah it's kind of weird that it gets the snipe on the outfeed end of the board, especially since it wasn't a long board. I've got some long boards to do and we'll see if having an outfeed support roller might reduce the snipe. Part of it may be that the infeed roller is metal and the outfeed is rubber.
Sounds like the weight of the board on the outer part of the outfeed table may be deflecting, ever so slightly the inner part of the outfeed table. A longer board with more weight could possibly accentuate this even more. The difference in metal vs rubber tops for infeed/outfeed tables could certainly play a role. Too bad infeed/outfeed tables are not made to a higher standard of rigidity! Chuck
 

JerseyHighlander

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Going into the cat litter business???
:sarcastic:
Funny, I bought the original Jet version somewhere north of 25 years ago, it's still essentially the same machine. Some differences with the motor mount/belt cage but still a very familiar machine.

Haven't used it in twenty years but if I remember correctly, the bad outfeed snipe was just a part of it's character. You just need to plan to waste the last six inches or so. Can minimize it by doing a nice light skim cut for the last pass, so you're not compressing that rubber on the outfeed roller too much but you're always going to get some. Make sure you support the outfeed well too.
 

scootac

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Looks nice, Greg! Well done!

In the pictures it looks like it may tend to be unstable (tippy) end to end if feeding a large, long heavy board thought it. The weight of the planer itself & cart may mitigate this, although the majority of the weight is placed for a very high center of gravity.

When feeding the test board thru were there any feelings of it being tippy?
Thinking the same thing! Looks like a lot of weight up high, especially the motor!, on a cart with a small footprint. Do the cart wheels lock down REAL tight? I sure wouldn't want any wiggle in them when feeding a big piece of wood thru the planer!
Seeing you taking it down the steps sure makes me appreciate that I can just back up to an overhead door and load/unload stuff into my shop!!!
 

woodtickgreg

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Thinking the same thing! Looks like a lot of weight up high, especially the motor!, on a cart with a small footprint. Do the cart wheels lock down REAL tight? I sure wouldn't want any wiggle in them when feeding a big piece of wood thru the planer!
Seeing you taking it down the steps sure makes me appreciate that I can just back up to an overhead door and load/unload stuff into my shop!!!
The cart is heavy and the planer is heavy, it's very well planted and yes the wheels lock down good. It looks ridiculously high in the pics but in actuality it's not really that bad.
Well at least I have straight steps. Sure I wish I had a better set up and a free standing shop. But remember, 9 years ago I had nothing! Didn't even know if I was going to have a house. So I am grateful for what I have. I make my basement shop work for me, it's cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Most people that see my shop for the first time are really surprised by it, not expecting to see so much in my shop. I feel very fortunate to have what I do have and I built it up from nothing.
This planer is a serious upgrade for me, and something I have dreamed about for a long time. The base of the machine is very heavy cast iron and most of the weight is in the base. It's really more stable than it looks.
 

woodtickgreg

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And for what it's worth I looked at the planer with the fixed bed and motor mounted underneath but it lost 2 inches of cut height and that was important to me. So I lost board pass back over the top of the planer and maybe some stability by keeping the motor down low, but I gained a max cut height of 8", that's pretty good for a 15" planer.
 

woodtickgreg

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Sounds like the weight of the board on the outer part of the outfeed table may be deflecting, ever so slightly the inner part of the outfeed table. A longer board with more weight could possibly accentuate this even more. The difference in metal vs rubber tops for infeed/outfeed tables could certainly play a role. Too bad infeed/outfeed tables are not made to a higher standard of rigidity! Chuck
It's not the table that flexes, it's just some give in the rubber outfeed roller. They are both very ridgid, but rubber is rubber. So I may loose 3 to 6 inches on a board, big deal, I've got lots of wood, lol. I'm very happy with the performance of this planer. The old dewalt had snipe too and this planer is way better than the dewalt.
 

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Why do you say that? Something I missed?
:lol2:
Just my first thought of what I'd do with all the shavings coming out of that thing.
Way back when I used mine, I had taken in two stray cats from the industrial complex where I had my shop. Worked for a few months before I finally took the time to hook up the dust collector. If I forgot to clean up the shavings from the floor, there was extra clean up involved.
To this day, if I'm running a chainsaw a lot in one area and develop a mound of sawdust/shavings, it gets shoveled into a bag or box to supplement the cat litter in the house.
 

woodtickgreg

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:lol2:
Just my first thought of what I'd do with all the shavings coming out of that thing.
Way back when I used mine, I had taken in two stray cats from the industrial complex where I had my shop. Worked for a few months before I finally took the time to hook up the dust collector. If I forgot to clean up the shavings from the floor, there was extra clean up involved.
To this day, if I'm running a chainsaw a lot in one area and develop a mound of sawdust/shavings, it gets shoveled into a bag or box to supplement the cat litter in the house.
Man I think I've thrown out 6 30 gallon bags it he last month or 2.
But I've also been processing some walnut and that's mixed in with the dust collector chips and that's not good for most animals.
 

2feathers Creative Making

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Man I think I've thrown out 6 30 gallon bags it he last month or 2.
But I've also been processing some walnut and that's mixed in with the dust collector chips and that's not good for most animals.
We use to use the walnut shavings for dog bedding. They are not welcoming to bugs like the fleas and ticks that usually bed down with your puppy. Of course that is an outdoor bed. Nobody wants their dog to beat the carpenter at dropping sawdust through the house...
 

JerseyHighlander

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Man I think I've thrown out 6 30 gallon bags it he last month or 2.
But I've also been processing some walnut and that's mixed in with the dust collector chips and that's not good for most animals.
We were paying a fortune for a natural/environmentally friendly cat litter that was made entirely from Walnut shells. The cats loved it and it worked better than any other at preventing odors.
I think a lot of the info about Walnut being harmful is very over blown. Every fall I make a medicinal extract from the green outer hull of the Black Walnuts, it's full of iodine and very good for us and the animals. One of the best dewormers you can use for dogs & cats too.

Round here that stuff always gets used somewhere; woodstove starter, garden/compost, use it instead of packing peanuts when I ship stuff, litter boxes, speedydry for when I spill motor oil or something. Maybe you can drop off bags of wood shavings at the local animal shelter...
 
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woodtickgreg

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Got it setr up today and made some test cuts. Figured out how to use the head locks to eliminate the snipe.
20231224_154854.jpg
I have the table height set the same as my table saw so I can use it as an infeed table.
20231224_154928.jpg
I planed some 5 foot boards with it and it worked excellent, no snipe as long as you lock the head for the last pass.
A video will be coming.
I did notice watching the video that the cartbdoes wiggle a bit when you crank the height wheel hard, when planing it doesn't move. Is this the ideal set up? I dunno, for now it is.
 

woodtickgreg

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Well I figured out a fix for the dust chute that exits on the wrong side for me.
 
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