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Have any quad-matching veneer links?

Discussion in 'Veneering' started by chicago, May 16, 2015.

  1. chicago

    chicago Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Location:
    Las Cruces, New Mexico
    First name:
    Phillip
    I have to do some quad-matching on a jewelry box ( I have to make two actually ) that I will have to get started on in the very near future. I understand the process very well, but the problem that anyone who attempts this is getting the seams to perfectly match the figure in the veneer without leaving any gaps.

    Here is a link to a video that I think is very good save for the fact that you never get to see a closeup of the final fit. I have no doubt that the gentleman did a good job, but the way he finalized the seam left me wondering what the seams actually looked like when dry.

    I have tried this on a test board in the past and I always seem to have a slight gap in the seam when the hide glue dries, so I will obviously have to learn to do this better in the future. I have seen several videos where they overlap two pieces of veneer and then cut both of them, remove the cut pieces and press the new seam together. That's great, but I do not think that the figure ever matches when you do that. I could obviously be missing something here, but since you cannot see the figure beneath that you are cutting I fail to see how the figure will match using this method. I have no doubt the seam will be snug, but that is all I get from this method.

    If anyone can shed some light on this I would be most grateful.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jerry B

    Jerry B shop dawg Full Member

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    Location:
    Boulder City, Nevada
    First name:
    Jerry
    If you're still attempting this project, I have a link that might help you a bit.
    As for technique, I personally lay everything out manually when matching grains, takes much longer, but get better results

    here is a link to doing a veneer compass rose, similar to what it sounds like you're trying to achieve :
    http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/hendersonM/veneerCompRose/vCompassR1.asp

    you can also try a Google search for marquetry techniques, which should get you all the info/processes/techniques you'll ever need
    there's a whole wood working culture dedicated strictly to marquetry, and the talent is absolutely astounding :good2:
     
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  3. barry richardson

    barry richardson Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    Location:
    Buckeye AZ
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    Barry
    Sounds like you want to do it yourself, but I bought a large lot of veneer at an auction a while back, mostly large paper backed sheets, already matched up, and several have 4 way book matching, with about 1 foot squares, on the entire 4'x8' sheet, I think it's tamo ash, or olive ash, really wild stuff. My plan was to cut it up in smaller pieces and use it for jewelry boxes and such. If your interested I can dig it out. It's buried under a bunch of sheet goods at the moment, mainly to keep it flat.
     
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  4. Jerry B

    Jerry B shop dawg Full Member

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    Location:
    Boulder City, Nevada
    First name:
    Jerry
    if chicago isn't, I might be interested sometime in future for some of that veneer, sounds exactly like the type of graining/patterning I enjoy working with :good2:
    lemme know if you ever get a path to it, and can snap a few pics
    I too plan on doing some jewelry boxes, and some custom humidor and could add your stuff to my collection :hi:
     
  5. West River WoodWorks

    West River WoodWorks Member Full Member

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    Location:
    Grand Rapids, Ohio
    First name:
    Tom
    How I do matched pieces is a bit easier, its called packetizing.
    1.) Lay all your pieces on top of each other in sequence. Sequence matching means in the order they were sliced off the log, 1 through 4 or however many pieces you have.
    2.) Using blue painters tape, tape the sides together forming a packet of veneers. Using a metal square or straight edge, mark your cut lines.
    3.) Cut through all your veneer following your lines.
    4.) With all the pieces still taped together, use a sanding block to sand your cut edges. I use 180 grit sandpaper glued to a piece of scrap wood. This will get rid of any jagged edges and give you a tight fit.
    5.) Lay out your veneer and tape it all together using blue painters tape. You should have one piece of veneer with tightly fitting seems.
    Good luck
    Tom
     
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