I hate end grain

Karda

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Hi i have a couple pieces of very dry red oak that have to be turned end grain. I want to try something different so I started a box. however when turning the inside I cannot not get a catch and for some reason the wood tears out near the center. Also I will cutting smoothly towards the center but when I get close the gouge stars cutting deeper by it self. Any guesses what I am doing wrong

end grain1.jpg

end grain.jpg
 

gman2431

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I really like the cupped carbide or the termite ring tool for this type of stuff.
 

Mr. Peet

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Tool choice might be an issue. Is it a gouge for everything? What size cutting edge and tool are you using? What radius?

I realize you are likely doing this as a one and done, but my brother bid a job years ago for a similar item, mass production. He used a forstner bit to cut most, and a second bit lacking the center point to clean the bottom. Was a good bit of sanding. Some cut cleaner than others.
 

Albert Kiebert

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I found that using a round nosed scraper and having a curved tool post placed very close to same curve of piece your shaping helps to reduce the issues your having.
 

duncsuss

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Have you tried starting the cut at center and cut outwards towards the wall?
 

ripjack13

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With that big line, It could be a chip that got caught in between the material and the cutting blade.
As for the endgrain tear out, you can use either ca or some other product to harden it up first. It will darken the color though.
 

ripjack13

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And just so it is mentioned....sharp cutters and very light passes help also....
 

Tom Smart

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This is a long video, you can skip around in it to find your answers. He makes everything look easy, it is not, but he has had more than 40 years to perfect his techniques. Agree with him or not on his 40/40 grind mantra, you cannot argue with his success.

Stuart Batty - How Gouges Cut
 

Karda

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I used my round carbide to smooth out the tear out and refine the rest of the inside it looks ok but I've done better. There is a pit at the center because I am doing a nice even cut from the outside and when the gouge gets close to center the gouge starts cutting deeper, this happens when I am doing bowls as well. I don't start at the center because I have more of a catching problem. I didn't use a forstner bit because the lid is so shallow, I can't hollow more than .75 of an inch. I can't watch that video because of the echo his accent and my hearing, I have already tried
 

duncsuss

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I don't start at the center because I have more of a catching problem
For face-grain bowls, this will be true - because twice per revolution you will be cutting uphill into end grain (like trying to sharpen a pencil starting at the tip and cutting towards the wood.)

For end-grain hollowing, starting at the center and cutting outwards to the wall is not going up hill, it's cutting through the grain. If you get a catch doing this, there must be something wrong in the way you present the tool to the work. You've said you are using a gouge - can you post a couple of photos of it? One looking straight on the end (so we can see the shape of the flute), and the other a profile shot, so we can see the shape of the bevel and wings.
 

Brandon Sloan

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I used my round carbide to smooth out the tear out and refine the rest of the inside it looks ok but I've done better. There is a pit at the center because I am doing a nice even cut from the outside and when the gouge gets close to center the gouge starts cutting deeper, this happens when I am doing bowls as well. I don't start at the center because I have more of a catching problem. I didn't use a forstner bit because the lid is so shallow, I can't hollow more than .75 of an inch. I can't watch that video because of the echo his accent and my hearing, I have already tried
One thing to practice is slowing down the cut as you get to the bottom center. If using a gouge, as you cut towards center, a small nub will form. Practice catching this nub in the flute of the gouge as you end your cut. Remember that the item on the lathe is rotating at its slowest dead center. Your tool is self feeding which is causing it to cut deeper. You want to control the cut, reduce the pressure and speed as you approach center.
 

duncsuss

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Try this video - Andre Martel has a different accent (not that Stuart Batty has an accent ... we're British, we don't have an accent :lol2:)

 

Karda

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I have a hearing problem that causes me to not be able to understand words and some tones, ad an echo and the way he speaks and i can't understand. Martel I can understand thanks Mike
 
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