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Information Overload Confusion Question

aag562

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From my intro not to long ago some of you might remember that I deal with quite a bit of pain in my daily life that keeps me up for a majority of the night so I watch YouTube videos about this amazing hobby that I embraced not to long ago. This as many of know is a double edged sword. Unfortunately for newbies and I am talking about the greenest of them there is no regulations so if tgey unwilling find someone who is interesteing could fill your head of dangerous information on the extreme end to simply silky on the other. I'm actually not certain how I found my way to this sits but I am extremely grateful, you not only filled ny addiction to burl but you have made me feel comfortable with asking all of the sometimes stupid questions I have. So here's my question or better yet when would you use either method..

When Halloween bowls I seen many videos that died from the center and work their way to the edge of the bowl but then I see many who work from The Edge and leave the center Mass saying that will help with bull not falling apart or make it easier for it to be turned. Do you leave the center mass only when you have thin walls and or fragile bowl? Do you never use this method? Or do you always use this?

For all of you that want a good laugh at my expense....I found a group on Facebook yesterday that people put beautiful, in mean stunning burl pieces up for auction, in is long as it took me to scroll down the page I managed to bid on 8 pieces, I was thinking I would have to sell a kidney or liver. Thank goodness I was out bid on 6 of the 8.

Have a great day folks and I look forward to hearing from you.
 

Karl_TN

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Leaving some center mass is more important if you are turning only once (natural edge, dry blank, etc.). I mostly hollow my bowls when the wood is still a little green. The walls are left around 10% thick compared to diameter and then the end grain gets sealed until the bowl has dried for a second turning. In others words, it doesn’t matter how a green bowl gets hollowed out as long as the walls are left an even 10% thickness. It‘s the second turning that should be completed from the outer edge toward the middle, but realize most of the middle wood got removed during the first turning to lessen the chance of cracking.

Tips: Sometimes I will turn a very large green bowl (14 to 22 inches) a third or fourth time while it’s drying. Doing this alllows me to remove any small surface cracks and gives me less warping to handle with each turning. Resealing the end grain the first couple of turnings is still important though.
 

Mike Hill

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In general - I'll drill a hole at the center so I don't have that pesky little nib to deal with. For dry stuff, I will usually hollow into the bowl/vase/hollow form in stages/layers from the outside to the inside. I'll get the outside wall thinned down to where I want it, then move down to the next layer. My theory is that the thin wall has more to support it and I don't have to go back to work on an unsupported thin wall.
 

Lou Currier

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The school of thought that I was taught is if it is end grain you go from the inside out. If it is side grain then you go from the outside in. I however am a stubborn learner and hollow bowl how I feel comfortable doing it. However I get a better finish cut coming in from the outside edge. I will leave bulk in the middle if I need support during the turning. Sometime I turn wood that others would throw away and support is often a good thing.
 

aag562

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With this it seems no one is right and no one is wrong, unless of course you are working dangerously. I know that most of you work with traditional tools and carbides are a bit different. I know that I have a difficult time with a couple of the round blades and being left handed I'm finding it difficult to get a comfortable position to hollow. I find myself straddling the legs from the end in Reaching Across the lathe. I'm having a blast learning and my thanks to all of you.
 

Lou Currier

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With this it seems no one is right and no one is wrong, unless of course you are working dangerously. I know that most of you work with traditional tools and carbides are a bit different. I know that I have a difficult time with a couple of the round blades and being left handed I'm finding it difficult to get a comfortable position to hollow. I find myself straddling the legs from the end in Reaching Across the lathe. I'm having a blast learning and my thanks to all of you.
I am left handed as well but find that using the handle in my right hand and guiding the tip of the tool with my left hand is comfortable. Took a little time to acclimate but works for me.
 

aag562

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I am left handed as well but find that using the handle in my right hand and guiding the tip of the tool with my left hand is comfortable. Took a little time to acclimate but works for me.
I'm trying but I was cursed with my left hand does 99% of everything and my right is an on looker. I honestly have very little control with my right it doesn't have the finesse that my left hand has if you know what I mean.
 

Karl_TN

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With this it seems no one is right and no one is wrong, unless of course you are working dangerously. I know that most of you work with traditional tools and carbides are a bit different. I know that I have a difficult time with a couple of the round blades and being left handed I'm finding it difficult to get a comfortable position to hollow. I find myself straddling the legs from the end in Reaching Across the lathe. I'm having a blast learning and my thanks to all of you.

I’m right handed, but still find some cuts are easier to make left handed so I taught myself to turn with either hand. It‘s not easy turning with the opposite hand if you’re not ambidextrous (I’m not), but it is possible with a bit practice and patience. Just go slow until you get some muscle memory built up to improve your confidence level. If your right hand is shaky then lock it to your hip, and then add a little swing into you turning like David Ellsworth.
 
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trc65

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Don't know if it would help you or not, but when I started turning, someone recommend Stuart Batty's "Seven Fundamentals of Woodturning" on Vimeo. He spends a lot of time talking about stance/body movement/ergonomics through various cuts. His style of teaching is a little slow for me, but shows a lot of good info in these vids.
Karl's mention of locking your hand to your hip reminded me of these videos. Stuart spends a lot of time showing how to use your whole body, not just hands/arms.
 

duncsuss

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I second Tim's recommendation to look for Stuart Batty's videos. He's nailed the technique of making each cut - I know of several professional turners who go back to him for refresher courses in the basics.
 

William Tanner

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Stuart has been to our club twice. The first time was before I was a member...I think. When we discussed bringing him back the second time, an old timer said if you take his class you will improve you skills by 300%. It did for me. We had him at the club for five days on his last visit.
 

aag562

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It's ironic that you folks mentioned arm locking and body movement because that has been my focus on the last few bowls, so much so that I was not paying attention to the tool yesterday that I had a catch that made me grateful for investing in a heavy duty face shield. I am going to find those videos and watch them. Thank you all for your help. I talk to my son daily and I tell him how great this place is but he is afraid to come on board right now because he is only 2 months away from purchasing his first home and if he has inherited any of my genes its a wise choice for him to stay away for now.
 
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