Logging via fb- Holly!

David Hill

I collect & use Texas woods---but prefer Mesquite.
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or subtitle: “ Don’t tell a Texas girl with a chainsaw what she can’t do!” ( and a husquie at that!)
Was perusing fb yesterday when I saw a post from one of my friends— that she had decided a Holly tree had to go! She had posted that she had most of it cut, but still had some “big” stuff to do. Fortunately was able to get her to let me finish the cutting. I had a few doubts of whether it was Holly, but my gosh—- it was! Pointy leaves, red berries and white wood!
My Stihl made short work of the stump— got 2 nice bigger pieces; she had started a cut yesterday.
Still have to seal ends.
Does Holly check much? Never seen it.

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DKMD

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I thinks it’s prone to checking and cracking, so I’d seal it ASAP. Nice find!
 

steve bellinger

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I’ve cut a lot of holly. I never had it crack any worse than anything else. Now as far as warping that stuff will warp like crazy. If it was me I’d definitely take as much of the pith out as fast as I could. If you have never turned holly you are in for a real treat IMHO. Make sure you cut up a bunch of smalls for finials. That stuff holds details like nothing else and can take it O so thin.
 

FLQuacker

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Biggest issue I've had with it is getting that green/blue tint staining in it....turned a pot call striker the other day and you are right! Wow...smooth to turn.
 

FranklinWorkshops

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I agree with Wayne. The holly will take on a grey-blue color if not dried soon after cutting. I would slice what you can as soon as you can and let it air dry in your shop for a year with stickers between each layer. The really white holly sold by retailers has been dried in a vacuum kiln soon after cutting, most likely. But holly has been used for centuries as inlay stringing so the old guys had to air dry it, I'm sure.
 

Nature Man

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What a beautiful sight -- a pickup loaded with wood! And Holly...wood at that! Congrats! Plan on selling any? Chuck
 

Mike1950

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I agree with Wayne. The holly will take on a grey-blue color if not dried soon after cutting. I would slice what you can as soon as you can and let it air dry in your shop for a year with stickers between each layer. The really white holly sold by retailers has been dried in a vacuum kiln soon after cutting, most likely. But holly has been used for centuries as inlay stringing so the old guys had to air dry it, I'm sure.
Kilns have been around for centuries also
 

FranklinWorkshops

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1890, popular science had a plan for home built wood kiln. They have been using kilns for a very long time.
Interesting, I'll look that up. Would like to see how they controlled the temperature and air flow before electricity. Solar kilns are a poor substitute as you know.
There was a lot of holly used for inlays in the mid 1700 to 1840 time period and I'm not aware of any wood kilns that early. Maybe there was and my historical knowledge is lacking.
 

Mike1950

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Found it. VERY interesting reading on the history of drying wood. First successful kiln seems to have been in 1875. This is well worth reading.

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Popular_Science_Monthly/Volume_45/July_1894/Kiln-Drying_Hard_Wood
Nah read further

Occasionally a little lumber for interior finish, where an extra fine job was desired, was run through the dry-house for a final drying, and later, after machine-made sash, doors, and blinds began to take the place of the old hand-made goods, being generally made from air-dried stock, they were sometimes put through the dry-house before being wedged and pinned.

These dry-houses contained such an element of fire risk that they were generally built in isolated positions as close to water as possible. Even then they were a constant menace to all surrounding property as well as to their own contents. Lumber, except in small pieces, dried in them was apt to be checked and warped or twisted more or less, and was not at all satisfactory save in the one feature of being free from moisture.

The fire risk at last became so great where the establishments requiring the dry-houses were situated in towns, and the restrictions of underwriters so onerous, that along in the fifties some crude attempts were made to substitute steam for the furnaces by conducting the exhaust from the engines running the works into the cellars.

It is not definitely known when or by whom the first attempts were made, but it is a fact that as early as 1855 the trial was made by a manufacturer in northern Massachusetts. But the experiment did not prove very satisfactory, for the reason that the steam had to be carried quite a long distance; the science of protecting steam pipes so as to prevent condensation was not as well understood as at the present day; the engine was none too large and the boiler capacity limited, and there was more or less back pressure.
 

FranklinWorkshops

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Nah read further

Occasionally a little lumber for interior finish, where an extra fine job was desired, was run through the dry-house for a final drying, and later, after machine-made sash, doors, and blinds began to take the place of the old hand-made goods, being generally made from air-dried stock, they were sometimes put through the dry-house before being wedged and pinned.

These dry-houses contained such an element of fire risk that they were generally built in isolated positions as close to water as possible. Even then they were a constant menace to all surrounding property as well as to their own contents. Lumber, except in small pieces, dried in them was apt to be checked and warped or twisted more or less, and was not at all satisfactory save in the one feature of being free from moisture.

The fire risk at last became so great where the establishments requiring the dry-houses were situated in towns, and the restrictions of underwriters so onerous, that along in the fifties some crude attempts were made to substitute steam for the furnaces by conducting the exhaust from the engines running the works into the cellars.

It is not definitely known when or by whom the first attempts were made, but it is a fact that as early as 1855 the trial was made by a manufacturer in northern Massachusetts. But the experiment did not prove very satisfactory, for the reason that the steam had to be carried quite a long distance; the science of protecting steam pipes so as to prevent condensation was not as well understood as at the present day; the engine was none too large and the boiler capacity limited, and there was more or less back pressure.
The "dry houses" reference in your quote are not called "kilns". Here is the paragraph just above the portion of the article you quoted:

"For years these dry-houses—they were not then dignified by the name of kilns—were only used in connection with certain manufactories for drying stock already cut up for tubs, pails, and other wooden ware; small boxes, chairs, and other furniture material; turned work and Yankee-notion stock in general; no regular lumber stock being subjected to the process."

THIS is down a bit farther in the article following your quoted passage:

"A patent was granted to Hannah and Osgood, November 27, 1866, for "an improvement in the method of drying lumber" and other patents followed in rapid succession, a full history of which is shown by the records of the Patent Office. But it does not appear that any really successful kiln was built until the year 1875, when one was erected at Stillwater, Minn., and a little later one in Chicago, if the records are correct, for Pond and Soper, though Turner Brothers had one built about the same time. The dates as to when the first steam drier was put in successful operation are a little foggy, claims being made both for Stillwater, Minn., and St. Albans, Vt."
 
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