Dismiss Notice
Woodbarter has upgraded to HTTPS. Please see click here for all the details.

Old finish

Discussion in 'Sanding & Finishing - Woodturning' started by Graybeard, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,170
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First name:
    David
    I got a gallon of Danish oil from a cabinet maker. He hated it. Couldn’t guess how long he had it. I’ve had it for four years at least. How long does it last? Have to use easy to locate finishes and get them in small amounts.
     
  2. gman2431

    gman2431 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,312
    Likes Received:
    1,656
    Location:
    Michigan
    First name:
    cody
    Why did he hate it?

    I never know how long stuff lasts but after a year or so of being opened I get Leary of stuff no matter what it is. Sometimes throwing it away and getting new saves some serious headaches.
     
  3. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,170
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First name:
    David
    Not sure why he didn’t. I’m having a hard time getting it to dry.
     
  4. Mike Mills

    Mike Mills Member Full Member

    Messages:
    1,181
    Likes Received:
    523
    Location:
    NC
    First name:
    Mike
    I did use it fairly often but can't help much, only occasionally now. My current can is probably close to 10 years old (and I just used some).
    Depending on the brand may contain Mineral Oil and/or Tung Oil and/or Linseed Oil (if polymerizer or not will affect drying); usually has some % of varnish. If the oils are polymerized I would give it about 2 days to fully cure; if applying a second/third coat I do so after a few hours.
    I do not know if this is the "proper" way but it works for me with Watco.

    "How long does it last?" The finish in the can or the finish on the wood?
    My finish in the can keeps until I use it up.... several years now; on the wood will probably get a dried-out feel/look and need reapplying maybe yearly.
     
  5. Schroedc

    Schroedc Trying to kick a nasy sawdust habbit.... Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

    Messages:
    10,237
    Likes Received:
    6,214
    Location:
    Rushford MN
    First name:
    Colin
    I find that it seems to matter it's been frozen or not at some point. Freeze it and it won't set right. Generally I'm finding a couple years max these days is about all the shelf life I get out of anything, probably because they took out the really toxic chemicals.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. gman2431

    gman2431 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    5,312
    Likes Received:
    1,656
    Location:
    Michigan
    First name:
    cody
    3 days with just one coat and I can put WOP over the top of mine. A real heavy coat I'll let it sit a week. How longs it been?
     
  7. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,170
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First name:
    David
    I put four coats on a day apart and they were fine. I decided to add an additional coat about a week later just to see how much gloss I could get and that's still tacky. It's been about four days.
     
  8. rocky1

    rocky1 Creator of Shavings and Sawdust! Full Member

    Messages:
    7,604
    Likes Received:
    2,980
    Location:
    Way North Florida
    First name:
    Rocky
    Weather change on you by chance David? If the shop cooled a little or humidity shot up, it might cause the difference in dry time.

    If your shop doesn't have a lot of dust in it that might create problems with your finish, like some folks hereabouts that shall remain nameless, you might set up a fan, turn it on low, and let it run for a day or so. Moving air can make a big difference in dry time on any finish, but that is especially true in cooler temperatures.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,170
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First name:
    David
    Interesting, the weather here has been unseasonably warm so I haven't fired up the wood stove. The room is a little cooler than usual. Could be the issue.
     
  10. Mike1950

    Mike1950 Founding Member Founding Member Full Member

    Messages:
    21,428
    Likes Received:
    6,230
    Location:
    Eastern Washington
    First name:
    Mike
    Rocky is right- High humidity really changes drying time.
    Watco may not be best route to get gloss finish.
    I know traditional thinking is old finish is bad finish but I bought a couple cases of finish for $1 a quart 6 yrs ago. I still cannot tell the difference from then to now and it was old then. and at the price of finish- which is not as good as it used to be, I will have to have a failure before I stop using it.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,170
    Likes Received:
    453
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First name:
    David
    I think too I didn't really wipe off the excess completely. It's slowly drying now that I've moved in into the house and under a lamp. I guess I'll keep the Watco. Tired of chasing the latest and greatest.
     
  12. rocky1

    rocky1 Creator of Shavings and Sawdust! Full Member

    Messages:
    7,604
    Likes Received:
    2,980
    Location:
    Way North Florida
    First name:
    Rocky
    Moving air will do more for you than heat. Put a fan on it, it'll dry quicker.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. duncsuss

    duncsuss Trying to turn a little better each day Full Member

    Messages:
    3,793
    Likes Received:
    1,485
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    First name:
    Duncan
    I don't know if I read this or made it up, so take it with however many grains of NaCl you wish ...

    One way to tell if a "drying finish" (such as Danish oil, BLO, tung oil, etc.) is still good is to take a piece of glass or ceramic tile and put a spot of the finish on it. Come back a couple of days later and if it has formed a wrinkled skin, it's still good. You can put a drop of mineral oil (or some other non-drying oil) on there also, to have a comparison.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  14. DaveHawk

    DaveHawk Member Full Member

    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    outside the beltway
    First name:
    david
    As an art major I know if your going to use a number of oil coats in a short period of time you will need to add accelerators (dryers) and hardness will help also.. I'll start with 50/50 oil/thinner plus dryers. The dryers I'll use if I'm going to put 2 costs on in one day. After 4 50/50 coats I'll add 2 coats of 75/25 , one a day and then a couple 100% coats.
    The inner coats need to be harder and much dryer then the costs laid on top.
    You can see the effects of oils that were not dried enough in a number of old masters painting in the cracking (alligatering)
    Oils never really dry they just get harder.
    Henceforth you never put acrylics over oils period. Your locking the oils in sd o they crack out.
    The reason lead was used ; lead is a Harding agent , a binder.
    I much prefer natural varnishes and natural softeners. Varnishes are to hard natural and need a softer such as bees wax. 85/15% or less depending on the material your laying it over.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
Current Time: 4:56 PM