Question Of The Week... ( 2019 week 48)

What is your finish of choice?


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    22
  • Poll closed .

ripjack13

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What finish do you go for when finishing most of your projects, polyurethane, shellac, or lacquer, or something else?
What is your reasoning?









:drinks:

**Rules**
There is no minimum post requirement,
primates, woodticks, wood spinners, and leprechauns are welcome to post an answer.
vote in the poll above!
 

woodtickgreg

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Mostly I use my own blend of oil based polyurethane. It's a mix of poly, tungsten oil, blood, and mineral spirits. That is mostly for flat work and some turning. But it does take a long time to dry and cure, but it has a depth and warmth unlike any other finish. I have also started using water based poly a lot more, it has gotten much better over the years. I like that I can use it indoors in the winter in my basement shop and there is almost no odor, not flammable, and it dries and cures really fast! I use it on indoor woodwork and trim for the house, and for almost any woodworking project in the shop. I would like to start spraying it someday. The dry time is just amazing. And it is absolutely crystal clear, so if you like the amber color that oil based finishes impart you have to start using stain to get that. But I like how it doesn't change the true color of the wood. There is a learning curve to it, but it's worth learning it in my opinion.
 

T. Ben

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On the few wood projects I’ve done,other than pens and such,I’ve always used oil based poly.
 

Nubsnstubs

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Lacquer has been my choice of finish from 1978. It dries quick, and from what I have seen from several of my customers furniture/cabinets I've built for them years ago, it durable. Three desks built in '84 sprayed with lacquer and the finish still looks like it was sprayed a month ago. Today's Lacquer is harder to spray than the older stuff.
In the summer of '63 and '64, I was the guy that mixed lacquer for spraying cabinets in newly built apartments in California. The difference from what that stuff looked like compared to now is amazing, and then the cost. I believe it was 3-4 bucks a gallon and pennies for the thinner. ................. Jerry(in Tucson)
 

Nature Man

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I'm still trying to figure this out! Tons of variables, flat work or turnings, wood species, food safe or not, gloss or satin, etc. Don't think there is one go to for all. I'm looking for answers on what's best. Chuck
 

Tony

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Cutting boards- mineral oil/beeswax mix
Turnings- shellac
Flatwork- poly
 

trc65

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Polymerized tung oil on bowls, WOP on flat work, shellac on small decorative turning.

Polymerized tung oil is wipe on, wipe off and dries quickly for an oil finish - 8 hour recoat. Can easily adjust the luster, and dont have to worry about dust nubs when drying.
 

DKMD

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I like the wipe-on oil/varnish blends like Minwax Antique oil or Formby’s tung oil. General salad bowl finish is another good one.
 

Sprung

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Question/poll is flawed! :sarcastic: It's very dependent on the project/type of work being done/intended use.
 

Bob Ireland

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Should have been an "other" category. I finish most of my projects with Hemp Oil but occasionally a beeswax/mineral oil mix.
 

sprucegum

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Pretty much polyurethane Spar polly for rough use and outdoor stuff, Latex polly on most stuff especially if I don't want the finish to darken the wood, Oil base if I want a little tougher finish.
 

David Hill

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Ha! I answered this recently in another post comment. It depends.....
My go to for turnings is polyurethane unless it’s a light colored wood and I don't want to darken it then I use polycrylic or lacquer. The polycrylic has a little learning curve (...but what doesn’t), and I think is tougher/more durable than lacquer for a piece that will see use.
Generally my first coat is a WOP that has 25% or less BLO mixed in— seals and grain pops!. Anything after is plain WOP or regular poly.
Rolling pins get mineral oil.
Mills are variable— poly or polycrylic, or...CA
 
Last edited:

Mike Mills

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Most of my items now are turning and I use shellac the most. Easy and quick to apply or correct. Anywhere from a matte finish to a high gloss.
Next most used would be oil (usually tung) and then lacquer.
 

Herb G.

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It depends on what exactly I'm finishing.
Cutting boards usually get a beeswax / mineral oil blend for a finish.
Doors get a spar urethane varnish or a lacquer based finish.
Tool handles get Minwax Helmsman Satin spar urethane spray. I use it on my lathe tools, and my shovels, etc. for the yard tools.
Any furniture outdoors gets alkyd based poly. That stuff is battleship strong.
Anything that's indoor furniture gets shellac in several coats.
 

TXMoon

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I didn't see an "other" vote but I use OB's Shine Juice, or Mahoney's Walnut Oil. I tried straight Shellac but dropped that once I discovered OB's. And sometimes, just simple walnut oil finish is all the wood needs.
 
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