Raven

Tom Smart

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Edgar Allen Poe:

"Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
Edgar Allen Poe? And all these years I thought that was Vincent Price. :ponder:
 

FranklinWorkshops

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They also pose for photos with kids. When our girls were 8 and 11, we visited the Tower and the girls were blown away by the beefeaters and their uniforms. Several of them posed with our girls. Really nice men. The ravens live a great life in the Tower and have no desire to leave it seems.

ravens-in-tower-of-london.png
 

FranklinWorkshops

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Edgar Allen Poe:

"Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
Local legend says the Poe wrote that poem while staying at the Deer Park Tavern in Newark, DE, about five miles from our house. Not sure if that is true but it is a fact that he often stayed there.
 

Mike Hill

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First Disclaimer- I make no claim that ANY of my Eng Lit teachers liked me publicly - maybe secretly - but they did not dare publicly!

I told one that like there was no crying in baseball, there was no poetry in football!

Over the years I have learned to appreciate SOME poetry - I guess mainly because of the skill involved. As a means to communicate - it sucks. With that said, The Raven caught my eye - interestingly enough I could care less about the "story" - h. e. double hockey sticks it is essentially a love story too ooey-gooey. What I liked was the structure. But then again, at that time in my life, poetry was just a tool. When I wanted to win a girl's heart - punch out a poem, and they fell for it. One girl I was so smitten by, I carved her a copy of Robert Indiana's LOVE sculpture out of redwood AND a whittled interlinked hearts out of maple. It worked for a while.

Here is what Poe said about the structure of the poem: If you can follow it, I bow down to you! I'm better at picking my nose than understanding the mysteries of poetic structure.

Poe had specific intentions regarding the metrical structure or prosody of the poem. In “The Philosophy of Composition,” he defines his calculated approach for ingenious versification:

Of course, I pretend to no originality in either the rhythm or metre of the “Raven.” The former is trochaic—the latter is octameter acatalectic, alternating with heptameter catalectic repeated in the refrain of the fifth verse, and terminating with tetrameter catalectic. Less pedantically the feet employed throughout (trochees) consist of a long syllable followed by a short: the first line of the stanza consists of eight of these feet—the second of seven and a half (in effect two-thirds)—the third of eight—the fourth of seven and a half—the fifth the same—the sixth three and a half.
Second Disclaimer - I think the raven carving is pretty cool!
 

Tom Smart

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First Disclaimer- I make no claim that ANY of my Eng Lit teachers liked me publicly - maybe secretly - but they did not dare publicly!

I told one that like there was no crying in baseball, there was no poetry in football!

Over the years I have learned to appreciate SOME poetry - I guess mainly because of the skill involved. As a means to communicate - it sucks. With that said, The Raven caught my eye - interestingly enough I could care less about the "story" - h. e. double hockey sticks it is essentially a love story too ooey-gooey. What I liked was the structure. But then again, at that time in my life, poetry was just a tool. When I wanted to win a girl's heart - punch out a poem, and they fell for it. One girl I was so smitten by, I carved her a copy of Robert Indiana's LOVE sculpture out of redwood AND a whittled interlinked hearts out of maple. It worked for a while.

Here is what Poe said about the structure of the poem: If you can follow it, I bow down to you! I'm better at picking my nose than understanding the mysteries of poetic structure.

Poe had specific intentions regarding the metrical structure or prosody of the poem. In “The Philosophy of Composition,” he defines his calculated approach for ingenious versification:


Second Disclaimer - I think the raven carving is pretty cool!
Dang, Mike, that's way too heady for me. But it did say something about how hard up you were to get girls.
 

Mike Hill

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When ya ugly and ignorant of the social graces - one has to do sumpthing! Ain't wood the answer to everything?
 

DLJeffs

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First Disclaimer- I make no claim that ANY of my Eng Lit teachers liked me publicly - maybe secretly - but they did not dare publicly!

I told one that like there was no crying in baseball, there was no poetry in football!

Over the years I have learned to appreciate SOME poetry - I guess mainly because of the skill involved. As a means to communicate - it sucks. With that said, The Raven caught my eye - interestingly enough I could care less about the "story" - h. e. double hockey sticks it is essentially a love story too ooey-gooey. What I liked was the structure. But then again, at that time in my life, poetry was just a tool. When I wanted to win a girl's heart - punch out a poem, and they fell for it. One girl I was so smitten by, I carved her a copy of Robert Indiana's LOVE sculpture out of redwood AND a whittled interlinked hearts out of maple. It worked for a while.

Here is what Poe said about the structure of the poem: If you can follow it, I bow down to you! I'm better at picking my nose than understanding the mysteries of poetic structure.

Poe had specific intentions regarding the metrical structure or prosody of the poem. In “The Philosophy of Composition,” he defines his calculated approach for ingenious versification:


Second Disclaimer - I think the raven carving is pretty cool!
Metrical structure? Prosody of the poems? Ingenious versification? Are those even real words? My favorite poems are Robert Service's "The Shooting of Dan McGrew" and "The Cremation of Sam McGee".
 

Mike Hill

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Of course, I've managed to thread jack once again. But life is just so interesting! and worthy of comment!

Unlike Paladin - I don't get too much from the Bard - BUT I do get a kick outta cowboy poetry! Some of my favorite lines, that I've forgotten come from cowboy poetry!

Because of my choice of career there is The Builders - by Longfellow.

And then, a few years ago I ran across - The Craftsman - by Marcus Christian.

But thin blue smoke really stirs my soul - And I just had to jot down a few words in its honor!


Ye Ode to the Brisket

How oft does want of Brisket doth torture my spirit
Slave of its delicious hauteur, nothing to do but tend
Like a melancholy malcontent, glistening eyes focused
Hours and times of my hunger the plateau doth pass
Nothing but time and precious mesquite can I but offer
Low and slow doth my sweet brisket’s beauty revealed
Sublime, rouse myself; and the weak wanton hunger
Shall from my bowels unloose its masculine restraint
Not at war, stomach at peace, content in fullness.
Oh mighty Brisket, penchant of memory, smoky perfection.

Started this one, but need to finish and refine. - It has about a dozen verses, but lots of work needed.

Lonesome Bubba Blues

Who me? I’m a lonesome smoker
Call me Smokey Lonesome
Gett’n mighty low, the shadow of a man I once knew,
Same old truck, same old job, same old stinky socks
But not the same old me – that cruel finger of fate
The real me no one ever sees- no one really cares
I once had something good, now there’s nothing there.
I could smoke a condor, feed it to the PETA crowd
and they’d want the recipe.






O
 

FranklinWorkshops

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This whole discussion of language in the old days versus now reminded me of this very funny comedy routine about what a children's story in the 1500s might sound like. This comedian said that Shakespeare had a vocabulary of 54,000 words compared to the average 3000 words we now use.
So take a few minutes to listen to the Three Little Pigs in a way you've never heard it before.
 
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Wildthings

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This whole discussion of language in the old days versus now reminded me of this very funny comedy routine about what a children's story in the 1500s might sound like. This comedian said that Shakespeare had a vocabulary of 54,000 words compared to the average 3000 words we now use.
So take a few minutes to listen to the Three Little Pigs in a way you've never heard it before.
That was fricken' awesome!!
 

Mike Hill

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This whole discussion of language in the old days versus now reminded me of this very funny comedy routine about what a children's story in the 1500s might sound like. This comedian said that Shakespeare had a vocabulary of 54,000 words compared to the average 3000 words we now use.
So take a few minutes to listen to the Three Little Pigs in a way you've never heard it before.
Why does one have to make up comedy - when the truth can be so funny - forthwith!
 

DLJeffs

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That's funny. It also struck me how funny comedians can be without resorting to foul language.
 
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