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Sanding Advice Please

Johnturner

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Here is pic of a wide rim bowl I am working on. I got up to 400 grit and noticed that there are fine sanding lines.
Start over at 120? Any other ideas?

20210627_160330.jpg
 

trc65

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I'd probably go back to 80x, some of those look deep. To help see those deep scratches, I blow off after each grit, and look closely with light at a low angle.
 

phinds

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You should never move up to a higher grit unless you are quite confident that you've evened things out at the grit you're on. OTHERWISE ...

And, yeah, you should move back to a low grit and start over.
 
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Alan R McDaniel Jr

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On some of the "You Tubes" I see guys using a sanding disc chucked in to a drill that they then use to sand bowls and such. I've never tried it on a lathe. I've used them to good effect on my carved bowls that have irregular surfaces but you've got to keep the disc contact surface in line with the grain or it doesn't do well.

Seems to me like it's a good way to get deep scratches going in more than one direction.

Alan
 

Lou Currier

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On some of the "You Tubes" I see guys using a sanding disc chucked in to a drill that they then use to sand bowls and such. I've never tried it on a lathe. I've used them to good effect on my carved bowls that have irregular surfaces but you've got to keep the disc contact surface in line with the grain or it doesn't do well.

Seems to me like it's a good way to get deep scratches going in more than one direction.

Alan
It may also help if you use sanding sealer and I agree with the others, start over, don't use a lot of pressure and keep the paper moving while you sand.
 

Tony

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John, do have reverse on your lathe? If you do, start over at 80 and sand forward and backward in each grit. That helps me out a lot.
 

DirtFarmer

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For bowls and such, I've found that there's a tool that you can put sanding pads on that rely on centrifugal force to spin the sander in different directions as the bowl spins. It's not perfect (and will bite your knuckles if you aren't too careful), but it's greatly reduced my sanding time.

 

Tom Smart

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Harbor Freight right angle drill for less than $25; hook and loop foam backed sanding pads on a mandrel; sand paper through grits 80 to 600; sanding sealer or raise the grain with water; slow speed on the lathe, alternate forward and reverse.

 
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