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Sanding Platters... Question

Discussion in 'Sanding & Finishing - Woodturning' started by Alan Sweet, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. Alan Sweet

    Alan Sweet Friendly Wizard Full Member Thread Starter

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    I am venturing into a new area, so I am lacking in in a few things.

    I am experimenting with making some shallow platters. Starting 4/4 wood. Platters 6-8" in diameter. I seem to be able to get forms and shapes I want but finishing has become a challenge for me.

    When I am sanding, I can't get rid of the bumps in the bottom. I think the variations in the grain are the issue. Some of the grain seems harder than others and as a result sanding varies across the grain or with it.

    Any suggestions or approaches?
     
  2. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    Is the bottom flat? If so, you can try a sanding stick that extends across the flat bottom of the plate.
     
  3. Schroedc

    Schroedc Trying to kick a nasy sawdust habbit.... Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    How are you sending them now? What grit do you start at?
     
  4. Alan Sweet

    Alan Sweet Friendly Wizard Full Member Thread Starter

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    @DKMD .. Flat where I want it. The flat area is where my issues seem prevalent. Sanding sticks... will give it try... I assume best w grain
    @Schroedc I Have tried starting w 80, 100, 120. 100 seemed to work better as a starter, but I can't get past 150 wo bumps.
     
  5. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member

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    What type of wood ? Sanding with lathe turning ? Have you tried power sanding ?
     
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  6. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    Alan, I was thinking of using the stick with the lathe on, but you could certainly try sanding with the grain while the lathe is off. Might even try a card scraper just for giggles.
     
  7. Alan Sweet

    Alan Sweet Friendly Wizard Full Member Thread Starter

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    Ok... I tried a number of things suggested here and from some guild members at our local guild, Alabama Woodworkers Guild. I guess I am too critical, but I had not the results I was looking for. So, when the obvious doesn't work, experiment.

    I have my best result at getting the results I want by the following approach.

    I wanted to get consistent hardness across varying grains. Tried various CAs. Results not what I wanted.

    I wanted it to penetrate and maintain consistency. So, I soaked the surface with walnut oil and let it set for about 1/2 hour, wiped it off. Then using folded shop towels (kinda like doing CA on a pen), I puddled walnut oil on to the towel and put a few drops of medium thin CA (Starbond). With the lathe running about 900, I applied three coats of this smelly stuff to the entire surface. Let it set for about 20-30 minutes.

    Then using Deft Lacquer Sanding sealer, I sanded from 120 t0 600. Applying sealer between grits and walnut to clean off residue.

    I am finally 95% satisfied. I think I have found a process to make me pretty much satisfied. But it needs tweaking, end grain transition and such.

    But, really no bumps or grain transition feel.

    But I think I've got it.
     
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    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  8. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    Pics, pics, pics!!!
     
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  9. barry richardson

    barry richardson Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    What do you mean by bumps? Rough? Lumpy? IMO you shouldn't have to go to that much trouble for a smooth surface. Have you tried a sharp skew layed flat like a scraper? Usually works for me. Then sand no more than necessary. Too much sanding can actually make the wood lumpy...
     
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  10. gman2431

    gman2431 Member Full Member

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    Sounds like a cleaner cut will eliminate the sanding at rough grits which is causing your troubles.
     
  11. spaz

    spaz Member Full Member

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    Yes, Alan. Sounds like you need a cleaner cut. You can try the sideways skew. Another easy way, and to make a clean cut, is to take a bowl gouge. Yes, sacrifice a bowl gouge. Now grind it traditionally at 75-85 degrees. Just rotate it on the platform. Then try it. Mention this as well to the Alabama club and see if anyone is doing this.

    --Eli Avisera also has a tool, made under Hamlet, just for this. It does take some finesse, fyi. The sheer cut tool is one, and can be found at www.chucksplus.com
    Best wishes, and give the grinding a try--Happy Turning!
     
  12. Schroedc

    Schroedc Trying to kick a nasy sawdust habbit.... Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    Another thing I'll do to get a really smooth final pass is to hit the surface with whatever I'm going to use as a finish, let sit a minute to pop the grain up and then turn at high speed and take a really really light cut with my EWT carbide. Usually after that I can go right to 320 for sanding.
     
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  13. Spinartist

    Spinartist Member Full Member

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    Again... What kind of wood??

    Some wood has both soft & firm grain which leave "bumps" due to the soft wood being sanded away faster that the harder grain.
    Overly spalted, almost punky areas in wood & wood with much softer sapwood will do the same.
     
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