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Sandpaper

Discussion in 'The Charles Neil Finishing Forum' started by Graybeard, Sep 11, 2015.

  1. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    I've been using Norton 3x sanding paper from Woodcraft and am finding the 120 and 180 grit leave some nasty marks. I'd love to be able to start with 220 but with my tools skills where they are now that's not going to happen.

    It seems the jump from 120 to 180 in coarseness is really huge. Once I get to 220 it's fine.

    Any ideas or recommendations? A different paper or improve my technique?

    Graybeard
     
  2. JR Custom Calls

    JR Custom Calls Gobble Gobble Full Member

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    I usually start at 320 if I sand, but stabilized wood just turns so well and that's almost all I use. If I'm using non stabilized softer woods, I use 120, 150, 180, 220, 320... Starting wherever I need to in the list. I also use Norton, and the new paper they started selling that replaced the old does a much better job IMO. At least it lasts longer.
     
  3. barry richardson

    barry richardson Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    I haven't encountered the scratches, but Norton 3x is my favorite too, at least for hand sanding, they put some linen or something in the backing paper that makes it very tough and resist tearing in use...
     
  4. Schroedc

    Schroedc Trying to kick a nasy sawdust habbit.... Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

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    I'm using 3M gold paper meant for auto body and really like the longevity, not too aggressive but aggressive enough if that makes any sense. The only drawback is the sheets come in a 50 sheet sleeve so when I stock up on paper I just end up dumping my wallet into the register.
     
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  5. TimR

    TimR Sawdust Engineer Full Member

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    David, in general, the rule of thumb I've used for sanding is start wherever needed (typically coarser than you think), and increase grit by about 50% or so till you get up a ways in grits..., so if you have to start at say 80 (some call it the 80 grit gouge :blush-33:), next is 120, 180, 260 ( I use 240), 320 (I use 400), 600, 800, 1000. I generally don't take much past 600 at the most, with the final couple grits often hand sanded. Even with acrylics...I don't go much past 1000, relying on buffing wheel to smooth things out for final finish.
     
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  6. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Can anyone recommend a good you tube video of someone sanding a bowl?

    Graybeard
     
  7. TimR

    TimR Sawdust Engineer Full Member

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    Inside or outside?
    I'm guessing you're talking inside, it's typically the most frustrating. Me...on 90% of bowls I do, I use a 2" sanding pad on the end of a close quarters Milwaukee drill. I keep the speed down on the drill motor, and do it on the lathe typically, locking the spindle (indexing) and making passes from outer diameter to inner, which helps remove tool marks.
    I'll see if I can find a good example of someone doing it that way.

    Ok..I found this by Mike Mahoney. Not exactly how I do it...but this guy does it for a living, and might just know what he's talking about!! :sarcastic:

     
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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2015
  8. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Thanks so much. I'm beginning to believe when the tool work is done, the real work begins and is something you can't rush.
    Graybeard
     
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  9. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    I use 3x for hand sanding, but I mainly use the 3" green discs from vinceswoodenwonders.com for power sanding. I generally avoid the soft backer pads in favor of the firm or medium pads. There are other sellers for Velcro-backed discs, but I've never used any of them.
     
  10. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Any reason you like the green over the blue? Most folks I know use the blue.

    I know I don't let the sandpaper do the work, rather I try to rush it in the course grits and thus cause more problems.

    Graybeard
     
  11. DKMD

    DKMD Sawbones Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator Full Member

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    I've used both colors, but I switched to green a year or two ago based on Vince's suggestion... I just can't remember why he suggested it.:wacko:
     
  12. Graybeard

    Graybeard Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Thanks, I too get my supplies from him. I may just give him a call next week and pick his brain.

    Graybeard
     
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