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Second guitar

DLJeffs

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Once I got my first guitar out of the form, I was able to start my second one. So far I've bent the mahogany sides, made and glued on end blocks, glued on kerfing, and sanded the sides. They reside in the form now. I also started on the top. This is a photo of the rosette I decided to make. It's a combo of black ebony and abalone. The fingerboard will come in from about the 10 o'clock position on the photo (so the wide abalone section will be centered on the wide section of the body. I'll be using ebony binding, ebony fingerboard and headstock, and a black pick guard. I like the simple, modern look. Working on bracing the top no. The back is mahogany to match the sides.

abalone and ebony rosette.jpg
 

DLJeffs

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Making progress on Guitar #2. Finished kerfing and radiusing the sides. Glued on side braces. Cleaned up the inside and today drilled the holes in the neck block and chamfered the heel block. Next up is cleaning up the braces on the back, marking and notching the sides, and gluing the back in place. Then after my coach helps me tune the top I'll glue it in place and the second box will be ready for binding.

neck attachment holes outside view.jpg

neck attachment holes.jpg
 

DLJeffs

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Good progress today. Cleaned up the ends of the back braces - you want the ends all uniform thickness if possible and extending far enough so they fit across the sides. I cut up an old angle brace to make me a couple metal shims that are a little under 0.125" thick. I tape these on each side of the braces. Then I carefully chisel down the ends of the braces until I reach the metal blanks. This way they all end up pretty close to the same thickness and I don't accidentally dig the chisel into the back of the guitar.

Put the back on the sides and make marks where the braces go, keeping the center line on the back aligned with the center line I marked on the end blocks. Use the dozuki saw to cut small kerfs INSIDE the marks. Used the Dremel with 0.125" bit, set to slightly under the thickness of the metal shims I mentioned above, to route out the wood between the saw kerfs. Then you file or use sandpaper taped to sticks to slowly work the notches, fit, sand, fit , sand until the back slips into the notches. This allows me to sneak up on the final dimensions so the braces fit as snug as I can make them. I'll double check the fit tomorrow and hopefully glue it up in the go bar deck.

guitar2 back brace close up.jpg

guitar2 back ready to glue b.jpg

guitar2 back ready to glue full view.jpg

guitar2 back ready to glue.jpg
 
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DLJeffs

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Back / body out of the go bar deck. Really happy with the way this one turned out. All joints tight, no light passing through anywhere. I must have learned something from the first one. Tally ho.

guitar2 back body glued.jpg

guitar2 back braces glued closeup.jpg
 
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DLJeffs

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Got together with my coach today. He's been really busy, plus trying to move to the coast and get a loan. Anyway, we shaved the braces and tuned the top today. It's going to be a little brighter than the first one. It'll be nice to play them side by side so I can try to hear the difference. It's now almost ready to glue to the body. I need to finish shaving the ends of the transverse brace and the X braces, then mark where they'll penetrate the sides, cut the notches and glue it in place. Then I'll have the second guitar in a box, ready for binding. We're going to use ebony binding so we'll be bending the binding first before we glue it on place.

2d guitar top tuned braces.jpg
 

DLJeffs

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Top glued on, out of the go bard deck and ready to trim & bind. Looks good, tight joints, no gaps. I'll cut me a piece of ebony for the end graft so it will match the binding. Hopefully this week end I'll meet up with my coach to bend the binding strips, trim and rabbet the sides and bind it. And get started on the finishing steps for the necks.

ready to trim and bind2.jpg

ready to trim and bind3.jpg
 

DLJeffs

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Worked on necks today. Drilled the access hole and then fit the truss rods. Next, applied a thin layer of silicon caulk to dampen the truss rod to eliminate any buzz from vibration. Checked and flattened the top of the neck and the fingerboard, then made sure the fingerboard joint provided a good glue joint. Then glued on the fingerboards. Glued all three necks and then we bent the ebony binding for Guitar #2. Tomorrow we'll make the second pass at roughing out the necks, drilling and gluing in the attachment nuts, and then I can start shaping them. The plan is to get this body done and then we'll fill, sand and spray coat both bodies so we can finish them as soon as I'm done with the necks. Also, here's a close up of the inlay I designed - Flying Fish Guitars, limited series of three guitars, true collector guitars.
fitting truss rod.jpg fitting truss rods.jpg fitting truss rod.jpg fitting truss rods.jpg dampening truss rod with silicon.jpg gluing fingerboard to neck.jpg gluing fingerboards to necks.jpg flying fish inlay.jpg
 

woodtickgreg

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Man I missed this one somehow, very cool. I totally dig the flying fish inlay, outstanding!
 

DLJeffs

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Yes, Mike, the back, sides, neck and end blocks, and neck are mahogany, the top is Adirondack spruce, the fingerboard is ebony. The back and sides on my third one will be either rosewood or myrtle, I have a set of each, with an adirondack top.
 

DLJeffs

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Made lots of sawdust today. Trimmed down the excess off the sides of the necks (couldn't do that until we glued on the fingerboards). Then I used a hand plane, Shinto rasp, bastard file and 80 grit sandpaper to rough shape the back of the necks #1 and #2. We'll hold off shaping the heel until we dry fit them on the bodies. I did all this shaping by feel - I don't have any of those template things. I can't feel any waves or uneveness so I'm hoping I don't need those.



shaping necks 2.jpg

shaping necks close up.jpg

shaping necks close up2.jpg

rough shaping necks.jpg
 
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DLJeffs

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Spent today trimming the excess off the top and back; sanding in preparation for binding; making and gluing in the end graft; cutting rabbets for the binding; and gluing binding on the back. The pre-bent binding strips worked out really well and made the job pretty simple. We make a mark at the waist and then worked toward each end to make sure we get the ends to mate up smooth. We'll do the top next time. I like the ebony binding versus the plastic tortoise binding, but it's a little less forgiving around the bends and twists so we had to be a little more careful how we cut the rabbets. The back looked really good with just the tape, with no need to wrap it with twine.

binding back 2.jpg

binding back and end graft.jpg

binding back.jpg
 
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Mike Hill

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Looking very good! Did you have to make the ebony binding or did you buy it? How did you cut the rabbit - trim router?
 

DLJeffs

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Looking very good! Did you have to make the ebony binding or did you buy it? How did you cut the rabbit - trim router?
My coach got the ebony binding strips from somewhere - probably one of the luthier suppliers. We taped them together in a single layer, side-by-side, and bent them in the side bender. We really soaked them and even let them set for a bit while we ate a sandwich, then spritz them one more time before bending. Left them in the bender over night, not sure if that helped or not. But it really helped gluing to have them nearly settle right into the rabbets.

For the rabbets, we use a trim router with a washer on the end of the bit. I think it was a 1/2" straight flush bit. The washer is sized so the depth of cut matches the thickness of the binding strip (so the binding fits nearly flush in the rabbet, saves on sanding and eliminates the potential to end up with uneven binding when you look at the top of the guitar. The depth of the router is also set to match the width of the binding. Because the bottom of the guitar is so curved, we put a couple small washers under the base plate of the trim router. This was a trial and error set-up, we put some in, then checked how the router bit sat, took some out, etc until we got it right. That essentially cants the base plate so it rides on the bottom of the guitar while the router bit rides parallel to the side. If you don't cant the router base, the bit will ride at an angle to the side and you end up either digging too deep or not deep enough. I'm finding it's the little things like that are what make a good guitar.
 
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