Something a little different

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,176
Reaction score
3,173
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
Honey locust bowl had the rim crack develop after rough turning. Grain patterns and colors were balanced in the bowl, so didnt want to do a fill with anything, but needed to do something. Had some bronze 22 ga art wire, so that is what I used.

Bowl is 9" x 3", tung oil finish.

What do you think? Too much, not enough, should have used something else, or should have just burned it?

IMG_3439_edited.jpeg

IMG_3448_edited.jpeg

IMG_3442_edited.jpeg

IMG_3446_edited.jpeg

IMG_3447_edited.jpeg
 

T. Ben

Member
Full Member
Messages
2,093
Reaction score
2,513
Location
Fairfax,Mn
First name
Troy
I like it,it’s a good looking bowl,the wire work well with it. Good job. :good2:
 

TXMoon

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,040
Reaction score
2,009
Location
San Antonio, TX
First name
Kevin
I like it a lot. You did a much better job wiring your bowl than the one I did. I think it's a great way to save a bowl. Can you post a picture of the other side of the wire?
 

Nubsnstubs

Where is it???
Full Member
Messages
1,712
Reaction score
2,777
Location
Tucson, Arizona
First name
Jerry
I like it a lot. You did a much better job wiring your bowl than the one I did. I think it's a great way to save a bowl. Can you post a picture of the other side of the wire?
I'll make a comment after I see the other side of the wire also. So Tim, with two people asking, you're under pressure now to get another couple pictures posted. ......... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

Tony

Hardwood Enthusiast
Staff member
Global Moderator
Full Member
Messages
17,295
Reaction score
22,579
Location
San Antonio, TX
First name
Tony
With seeing your work I know the other side of the wire looks as clean as what we can see. I think it looks great, good way to save a cracked piece!
 

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,176
Reaction score
3,173
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Thanks everyone, I appreciate your comments!

Innovative! How did you cinch up the wire? Chuck
At 22 ga, there is just enough rigidity that when pulled tight, the bends stay in the wire. I only had to make a bend in the last little bit after I cut it to length and tucked it back in the hole with a drop of CA to hold it. The crack is stable, so wire isn't holding anything but itself.

Belay my last. I used a leather tie rather than wire.
Leather was a consideration, in fact I was all set to cut a length when I remembered I had some art wire laying around. Was also considering some hammered copper wire, but only had 14 ga wire and it seemed to big after hammering it out, not to mention it hardened it enough would have been difficult to bend.

Won't the milk leak out while you're eating your Kaptain Krunch in the morning?
At 9" diameter, it's just a little too big for my Kaptain Krunch, but just about right for my ice cream!
 

Gdurfey

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,750
Reaction score
2,528
Location
Falcon, CO
First name
Garry
@trc65 , Tim, as always you seem to take it to the next level! Great turn by the way, darn wood...…...but nice save!!
 

ripjack13

ɹǝʇɹɐqpooʍ
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
Forum Moderator
Messages
25,864
Reaction score
29,152
Location
Connecticut
First name
Marc
**canned responce**
That looks perfect. Nice job.

Seriously though, well done. I may have added another x below though, just to cover the entire length of the crack.
 

DKMD

Sawbones
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
Full Member
Forum Moderator
Messages
10,718
Reaction score
16,166
Location
Enid, Oklahoma
First name
David
I like it! It’s understated, but I prefer that to something more dramatic. I wonder how the look would change if you forced a patina on the wire?
 

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,176
Reaction score
3,173
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
**canned responce**
That looks perfect. Nice job.

Seriously though, well done. I may have added another x below though, just to cover the entire length of the crack.
That's a great idea! Going to pull out the pin vise and drill some more holes.

I like it! It’s understated, but I prefer that to something more dramatic. I wonder how the look would change if you forced a patina on the wire?
Thanks! Hadn't thought about changing the patina, but that opens up many more possibilities for accent colors. All the art wire I have has some sort of sealer on it, but plan to pick up some uncoated copper from about 18 AWG up to 24 AWG to play with hammering and patinating.

I like it also. I think hammered would’ve been awesome and may have been worth the trouble
I really like the hammered look too, but 14 AWG was just too large, and I didn't want to wait on getting smaller wire. I've (un) fortunately have a couple of other roughed bowls with rim cracks that I was going to pitch, but after everyone's comments here, I'm kind of excited to get to them and try some of these ideas!
 

Nubsnstubs

Where is it???
Full Member
Messages
1,712
Reaction score
2,777
Location
Tucson, Arizona
First name
Jerry
Tim, you did a nice job on that bowl. Honey Locust is a good looking wood. I'm going to have to get some next time I go east....You also did good at hiding the wire ends.
My thoughts on the wire would be to twist it using a drill. Telephone wire I believe is smaller than 22 gauge wire. To twist it, make a hook from a nail, get a length of wire, put both ends in a vise. The loop will be in the hook, stretch the wire as tight as you can, and start twisting it with the drill. Twist until you like the pattern. Remove it from the vise and hook. Roll it up until you have about a 3 inch coil of twisted wire. Tie it with another piece of wire, and then either put it in a BBQ, fireplace of even on the stove top. Heat it until it's red, then quench it.
It should turn black, and will be annealed where it's soft again. Untie it and straighten it by putting it back in the vise and on the hook. While in the drill, and vise, give it a couple yanks to straighten it. Take a piece of steel wool, fine sandpaper, scotchbrite, and stroke it some. That will remove some of the black and give you copper highlights. Do your weave and done.
If you do decide to hammer it, make sure you anneal it by heating and quenching. To remove all the black, I believe borax and water can be used to remove the oxidation. Memory is failing, so don't really remember if it works on copper. I have used it with gold and silver.
Keep up the good work. You never cease to bring beautiful pieces to our attention...... ........... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
1,176
Reaction score
3,173
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
Thank you Jerry! A wealth of information in your post. Going to try some of the twist and blacken treatment, copper highlights with black background would be perfect for some of the black locusts blanks I have.

Knew I needed to anneal it after working, but didn't know how, so you've saved me time looking it up and interpreting. I've done a fair amount of work with tool steels (01, W2), but nothing with softer, "ornamental" metals. Lots of possibilities and so little time!
 
Top