Something a little different

Nubsnstubs

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Tim, you did a nice job on that bowl.
If you do decide to hammer it, make sure you anneal it by heating and quenching. To remove all the black, I believe borax and water can be used to remove the oxidation. ...... ........... Jerry (in Tucson)
The borax and water must be on a slow boil with your stuff in it for maybe 20 minutes. test to get the time needed......... Jerry (in Tucson).
 

Nubsnstubs

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The borax and water must be on a slow boil with your stuff in it for maybe 20 minutes. test to get the time needed......... Jerry (in Tucson).
Edit, Edit!!!............ During my daily snooze, I woke up with one of those O S! moments. That is not supposed to be Borax as indicated above. You use water and Alum. That will take the flux residue and oxidation off your metal. Then you polish it.

Borax is used as a flux when you are melting your metal for casting. Too old to remember everything I learned ...... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

TimR

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Looks cool Tim. I like leaving the open wound in pieces that crack or have big voids, but the wire says “hey, we’re holding things together here”!
 

trc65

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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Well, I really liked Marc's idea of adding an extra cross of wire on the bottom of the crack, so grabbed set of mini pliers and started to pull the wire out. Unfortunately, enough tung oil had seeped into the holes to glue them in as effectively as CA. They wouldn't come out! Eventually, all the ends broke off leaving holes with filled with wire.

No problem I thought, I'll just carefully drill them out..... yeah, that didn't work too well, although I did get a new set of holes..... to go along with the original ones!

At this point I quit and decided the bowl would be my first sacrifice to the wood gods as soon as it got cold enough to have a fire.

Thought about it overnight, and thought I might try just sawing the crack wider to get rid of the numerous holes and start fresh. Did that, but then, the wire looked too small for the crack, so took Jerry's idea and twisted some together, and to my eye looked pretty good, or at least as good as it could.

I like the original one better, as the crack doesn't look as "natural" to me, but it will no longer be going into the burn pile.

Thanks to all for your comments in this thread, it really does help to have others put a critical eye to one's work.

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Mike Hill

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That is very cool. Can't quite call it kintsugi - but definitely wabi-sabi. There is a small group of dedicated antique collectors - usually country collectors - who collect what I call "make-dos". There is even a book or two devoted to them. Something that has a defect or broken, but patched or otherwise repaired so it can have a longer useful life. Have a few collecting dust around the house - including moi!
 
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ripjack13

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Nice recovery. I just meant to add one, not redo it. Still looks good.


Really nice :good2:Thought about doing something similar in the past and now I want to find/turn a cracked bowl :nodice:
Make your own Lou. Just cut a v into one, and sew it up.
 
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