Tree Value Calculator

TNTreehugger

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It was a lucky accident that I came across this web site forum today via another online arborist forum.

I've been searching for a tree value calculator for an insurance claim I've filed.
What I need is one that will calculate the value of live trees, not for board feet value, or other woodworking uses.
I've found several and they all seem to be similar/same.
I was wondering if y'all think the formulas are accurate, or if you've seen something better.


Thanks. đź‘Ť
 

2feathers Creative Making

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Easiest way I know is to call a nursery and find out what their price is for a replacement. Other than that, what I am seeing in this calculator is comparable to the prices I have heard for Colorado. I am unsure about local or regional prices.
 

Mike1950

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WSU priced trees/shrubs damaged or destroyed on campus by the inch. 1"= $100. This was in early 80s. Some metal workers were welding on our scaffold and set the juniper shrubs on fire below them. School inspectors crawled in shrubs and measured each little stump. The bill was huge..
 

TNTreehugger

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Easiest way I know is to call a nursery and find out what their price is for a replacement. Other than that, what I am seeing in this calculator is comparable to the prices I have heard for Colorado. I am unsure about local or regional prices.
Thanks. I would think even a nursery would use some kind of calculator to price a specimen tree.
Most of the trees I'm submitting are 20' to 40' tall. We have lots of nurseries in the area, but I doubt they handle many trees this size.
 

Mr. Peet

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You might have some use of the calculator to get something. The ISA has a basic baseline value that gets added to by other features, such as species, age, height, local values, timber values, esthetic values, growth zone, replacement value and much more.

Your $663.70 maple, what species of maple? 10 year old, 16ft. tall 17" circumference (5.4" DBH). $663.70 might buy you a replacement tree, half that size, and that likely would not include installation or warrantee. Region plays a big part as well. A long leaf pine in Virginia cost half for the same tree in southern PA, supply and demand issues.

Specimen is top dollar, you look at prime, ones, twos and threes? What species do you have and why are you trying to find values?
 

TNTreehugger

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WSU priced trees/shrubs damaged or destroyed on campus by the inch. 1"= $100. This was in early 80s. Some metal workers were welding on our scaffold and set the juniper shrubs on fire below them. School inspectors crawled in shrubs and measured each little stump. The bill was huge..
Would that be $100 per inch diameter?
That sounds about right as an average 6' B&B tree would sell for about $100

But, that doesn't take into account the species, or tree height.
Everyone knows black walnut is very valuable. :lol2:especially compared to a redbud or poplar.

I converted my circumference measurements to diameter and used the $100/per inch and the total came to less than half what I got using the Tree Value Calculator.
 

JD1137

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You might ask your local municipality if they have a tree ordinance (most do). Most municipalities have a need for replacement value of trees because inevitably folks seriously damage, or cut down, public trees and the town will sometimes ask for replacement cost damages.

Should be based on diameter breast height (dbh) for specific species (but not always based on species). Some ordinances are just based on inches/DBH.

Would think the town would have pretty accurate estimates (most costs are developed with input from local arborists) based on where you live.
 
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TNTreehugger

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You might have some use of the calculator to get something. The ISA has a basic baseline value that gets added to by other features, such as species, age, height, local values, timber values, esthetic values, growth zone, replacement value and much more.

Your $663.70 maple, what species of maple? 10 year old, 16ft. tall 17" circumference (5.4" DBH). $663.70 might buy you a replacement tree, half that size, and that likely would not include installation or warrantee. Region plays a big part as well. A long leaf pine in Virginia cost half for the same tree in southern PA, supply and demand issues.

Specimen is top dollar, you look at prime, ones, twos and threes? What species do you have and why are you trying to find values?
Exactly. That's why the $100/per inch won't work for me.

In a nutshell, two years ago everything on my property was contaminated with 24-D herbicide from neighboring cropland. It's been a nightmare, to put it mildly.
Anyway, I'm to the point where I'm ready to talk compensation with the farmers insurance company. A claim was filed with them two years ago and everyone has been saying "wait and see."
Anyway, long story short, out of 135 trees on my property there are 18 that are either dead, or will be in a year or two. Thank goodness, the rest appear to finally be recovering. I have not seen green healthy leaves on anything in my yard for two years - thankfully this year what's not dead is a lush emerald green and my magnificent buckeye is loaded with blooms.

The trees I've listed, and they are the same ones I said two years ago were going to die, are:
Paulownia - 78"c x 40'h and 48"c x 29'h
Redbud 4 x 10"c to 36"c x 20'h
Black walnut 5 x 36"c to 82"c x 14'h to 36'h
Poplars 3 x 18"c to 24"c x 17'h
also a 2' x 7' Nandina hedge and two grapevines
 
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TNTreehugger

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You might ask your local municipality if they have a tree ordinance (most do). Most municipalities have a need for replacement value of trees because inevitably folks seriously damage, or cut down, public trees and the town will sometimes ask for replacement cost damages.

Should be based on diameter breast height (dbh) for specific species (but not always based on species). Some ordinances are just based on inches/DBH.

Would think the town would have pretty accurate estimates (most costs are developed with input from local arborists) based on where you live.
I live in the rural part of the county, but I'll check with the city tomorrow. They are members of the Arbor Day organization and I know they have to have an arborist to qualify for membership.
Good suggestion. Thanks.
 

Nature Man

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Wonder if there is a university in Tennessee you could check with for a bit of guidance. When I lived in California, the University of California in Davis brought a lot to the table in terms of information on trees. Chuck
 

TNTreehugger

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Wonder if there is a university in Tennessee you could check with for a bit of guidance. When I lived in California, the University of California in Davis brought a lot to the table in terms of information on trees. Chuck
Another good idea!
 

Mr. Peet

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Exactly. That's why the $100/per inch won't work for me.

In a nutshell, two years ago everything on my property was contaminated with 24-D herbicide from neighboring cropland. It's been a nightmare, to put it mildly.
Anyway, I'm to the point where I'm ready to talk compensation with the farmers insurance company. A claim was filed with them two years ago and everyone has been saying "wait and see."
Anyway, long story short, out of 135 trees on my property there are 18 that are either dead, or will be in a year or two. Thank goodness, the rest appear to finally be recovering. I have not seen green healthy leaves on anything in my yard for two years - thankfully this year what's not dead is a lush emerald green and my magnificent buckeye is loaded with blooms.

The trees I've listed, and they are the same ones I said two years ago were going to die, are:
Paulownia - 78"c x 40'h and 48"c x 29'h
Redbud 4 x 10"c to 36"c x 20'h
Black walnut 5 x 36"c to 82"c x 14'h to 36'h
Poplars 3 x 18"c to 24"c x 17'h
also a 2' x 7' Nandina hedge and two grapevines
The Red bud, you need to separate the 4. The 36"c, single stem, any way, that might be a challenge. A 10"c stem by 15' tall is common nursery stock.

Same for the walnut, need to separate.

Poplar, as in Tulip poplar? If so the sizes you list are also common nursery sizes.

Are they wild grape? Some of the native grape are becoming rare and carry value for that.

Did you get any soil testing done this spring to assure concentrations are below threat or none recordable?

Cooperative extension and county forester (often through DNR) can also help. They might not be able to price items for legality reasons, but sometimes they can.
 

TNTreehugger

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The Red bud, you need to separate the 4. The 36"c, single stem, any way, that might be a challenge. A 10"c stem by 15' tall is common nursery stock.

Same for the walnut, need to separate.

Poplar, as in Tulip poplar? If so the sizes you list are also common nursery sizes.

Are they wild grape? Some of the native grape are becoming rare and carry value for that.

Did you get any soil testing done this spring to assure concentrations are below threat or none recordable?

Cooperative extension and county forester (often through DNR) can also help. They might not be able to price items for legality reasons, but sometimes they can.
Thanks for the info.
As for the testing, a Dept of Ag inspector has tested the past two years and again a couple of weeks ago.
Two years positive for 24-D, still waiting for this years results.
I've read and been told different things about the soil, depending on who funds the testing. Also read it stays in the trees... which is why the inspector thinks last years positive test results were left over from previous year contamination.
There's definitely a lot of politics involved in these chemical trespass cases.

I didn't need any test results to know something was/is terribly wrong with the trees- chlorotic, mutant leaves constantly growing and dropping, lots of limb dieback, flowers and potential fruit decimated and dropping, dark black/brown cambium and pith seen at the fallen limb joints... on an on.

I just want to get off this ride ASAP.
 

Mike1950

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Would that be $100 per inch diameter?
That sounds about right as an average 6' B&B tree would sell for about $100

But, that doesn't take into account the species, or tree height.
Everyone knows black walnut is very valuable. :lol2:especially compared to a redbud or poplar.

I converted my circumference measurements to diameter and used the $100/per inch and the total came to less than half what I got using the Tree Value Calculator.
please note the date in my post
 

TNTreehugger

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please note the date in my post
Forty years ago that happened.
You think the per inch would have doubled since then? If so, that would be closer in line to the Tree Value Calculator amount.
 

2feathers Creative Making

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Thanks. I would think even a nursery would use some kind of calculator to price a specimen tree.
Most of the trees I'm submitting are 20' to 40' tall. We have lots of nurseries in the area, but I doubt they handle many trees this size.
True most of the tree nurseries around mcminville tend to stop around 4 inch diameter. I figure they have the calculator in hand is the only reason I would use them...
 

TNTreehugger

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Did they come up with a number?
Yes - average $5k retainer plus that much more for an "expert" to determine tree/property/damage/value, etc.
They also informed me the ins. company would also have their own experts and there was no guarantee I would get anything.
That's when the conversations ended. And that's why I'm trying to handle it on my own first.
 
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