• A New Photo Gallery Has Been Added!!! Please share pictures of your finished projects in the New Photo Gallery for everyone to enjoy browsing. The New Photo Gallery is for FINISHED PROJECTS ONLY!! The New Photo Gallery section was created to give people a place to view photos without having to read through all the threads. Enjoy everyone and please contribute!

Two More....you guessed it.....Hollow Forms

Steve in VA

Member
Full Member
Messages
838
Reaction score
1,592
Location
Virginia
First name
Steve
Here are my next two attempts, and the last of the advice I'm going to ask on hollow forms.....for this week at least :thanx2:

Feet.....still go smaller is what I'm guessing I'm going to hear, especially with the one on the right? I need to follow the advice of one wise @barry richardson and go smaller than you think it looks like on the lathe. I "thought" I nailed it until I parted it off. These are 3" and 5" tall.

Overall these are just about breaking the learning curve and I feel as though I'm quickly getting the hang of the John Jordan tools. Smoothing out the inside a bit more will be my next challenge.

One other quick question. Do most of you use completely dry wood? I'm noticing that while cracking has not been an issue (I've been bagging them), there is still enough movement that then appears to be bulges versus a smooth curve. I'm sure that's in the eye of the beholder, but in general what's the best approach? And does "twice turning" as you would with a bowl give you the best of both worlds? If so, does the 10% of diameter rule work well to allow wet wood to dry yet still prevent most checks from occurring?

Thanks for all of your help along the journey!

Polish_20210310_171140955.jpg
 

Gdurfey

Member
Full Member
Messages
2,489
Reaction score
3,783
Location
Falcon, CO
First name
Garry
Cool, I like. for some reason, the one on the left jumped out at me. It is not that it is prettier than the right one, just something about it caught my eye and made me go ooooooohhhhhhh first!!!

I’m learning from you too Steve. It will be interesting if someone says smaller foot on the right.....either way, I like them. Answers to the “wet” question will also be informative.
 

Tony

Hardwood Enthusiast
Staff member
Global Moderator
Full Member
Messages
18,563
Reaction score
24,496
Location
San Antonio, TX
First name
Tony
They both look great to me. I'm with Gary, the one on the left stands out for me. I would make the foot smaller on the right one. One thing I've learned is to take your piece off the lathe with the chuck still attached and stand it up. Gives you a better perspective of what it will look like finished. Your work is quickly improving!
 

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
2,063
Reaction score
5,374
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
Beautiful forms, really great eye catching shapes - both of them, but the one on the left is spectacular. Love the really white wood with just a couple spalt lines. Don't know what your plans are for finish, but I would finish it with lacquer or a water clear finish to keep it as white as possible.

Since you asked, yes, you could narrow up the very bottom of the one on the right. It looks like it flares out ever so slightly right at the bottom, but that could be the angle. If it flared in, instead of out, it might be perfect.

As to your other questions, I'm eagerly awaiting the answers as well.
 

woodtickgreg

scroll, flat, spin
Staff member
Global Moderator
Founding Member
Full Member
Forum Moderator
Messages
16,568
Reaction score
20,267
Location
Eastpointe, Mi. usa
First name
Greg
I do t think the one on the right really needs a smaller foot but more of a rounded edge on the bottom. It just has a sharp edge that makes it look large, if it was a little more rounded and flowing it would give the illusion of being smaller and yet offer the stability of a wider foot. I sometimes think people get too hung up on the foot size and don't really look at what makes the proportions look right or wrong. I would rather have a piece that is stable instead of one that falls over if you look at it hard enough, lol. Ask yourself when looking at it what is there that doesn't look right. I sometimes unscrew the chuck from the lathe and stand the piece up and look at it, if it doesn't look right I can just screw the chuck back on and make the changes.
I think both those pieces look great. :good2:
 

barry richardson

Moderator
Staff member
Global Moderator
Full Member
Messages
9,279
Reaction score
14,445
Location
Buckeye AZ
First name
Barry
Looking good Steve, I turn both wet and dry blanks. A large piece of dry wood usually has some cracks, so if you don't like the look of them, go with a green blank, rough turn and hollow it. I let them dry in a double paper grocery bag in our mud room which has a steady temp. A cardboard box works too. I usually try and stick with the 10% rule for roughout thickness. Your form on the left has a great shape, the one on the right is good too but I would tuck in the bottom bit just a little, continuing the radius you have coming down the side of the form....
 

Steve in VA

Member
Full Member
Messages
838
Reaction score
1,592
Location
Virginia
First name
Steve
Thanks guys!

The base on the one on the right was intentional as I thought flaring it out a tad might help lift it, but I see it's the opposite of what I was thinking and continuing the curve all the way through is probably the right way to go.

I've been pretty successful drying bowls in bags without shavings (too many mold issues) and so will have to give that a try with some hollow forms as I much prefer turning it green. All the ones I've shown thus far have been turned to final thickness, parted off, and then dried in a bag with good results, albeit some movement.

When rough turning a hollow form, what do you do with the tenon / base to help limit the cracking yet still have the ability to rechuck it? I would think it would be particularly prone to cracking as most of them are end grain vs. most bowls being side grain. And very prone to cracking if turning from a full log with the pith centered? Or are you only using a half to a quarter of the log with the pith being removed?
 

trc65

Member
Full Member
Messages
2,063
Reaction score
5,374
Location
Cameron, Illinois
First name
Tim
Remember reading a while back that one thing to help prevent cracking with the tenon is to cut partially through as if you were going to part it off, but still leave enough meat there to support the 2nd turn. How much that is, I'm not sure.

Barry and others will have to add in what they do/What actually works.
 

Nature Man

Member
Full Member
Messages
8,767
Reaction score
6,054
Location
Redding, CA
First name
Chuck
I really like both of these, but if I had to make a comment about the one on the right it would be that the top is a bit "clunky" looking compared with the delicate nature of the rest of the form. Not having turned any of these, I'm not really sure how I would change it. Chuck
 

Mike Hill

The Bard of Barbecue
Full Member
Messages
3,003
Reaction score
4,758
Location
Nashville, TN
First name
Mike
They are gorgeous! Can't wait to see them in their finished state. They only thing I could add is what others have said already about the base on the right one.
 
Top