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Two multi-axis peppermills.

Alan Sweet

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These are both in Sweet Gum, one is 11.5" crush grind mill; the other 15.5" American grind mill. Both finished walnut oil, mineral oil, and CA. Looking for critical remarks, I am still pushing my envelope in multi-axis turning, so it can use improvement and advice.

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Fsyxxx

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Dig the shape of the mill, I think it would be awesome if you could keep that idea with the cap also. Overall they are pretty rad.
 

trc65

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Very attractive designs and beautiful wood. My only critique is in these pictures their appearance is slightly top heavy. The thicker offset near the top along with the size of the caps cause this appearance. Ideally, in mills this tall I think they would benefit from a more substantial base. Maybe a slight increase in height of the center turned base would balance the look???

Edit, I keep looking at these, and I'm not sure now if they appear unbalanced, or it's just a function of the multi-axis design shown in a 2D image??
 
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Nature Man

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They both look exceptionally fine! Wondering how they feel in your hand when using them. Think the point on the first one is too sharp, potentially. I wood selection is superior. Chuck
 

Alan Sweet

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I agree
Ideally, in mills this tall I think they would benefit from a more substantial base.
Part of the presentation is that the photographer (me) is still a rank amateur with a camera. I have also noticed with asymmetrical turnings , 2d often depends on the orientation. I hope this illustrates.

Screenshot 2022-09-14 224917.png
 

Alan Sweet

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Chuck;
Wondering how they feel in your hand when using them.
For sweet gum, requires a lot of elbow grease and patience to finish. If you let the piece set for a long while, the fiber ends will rise in the sharply curved sections. So sanding ( I go up to 400 grit on sweet gum) and coats of wlanut oil x CA mixture to finally get a smooth lasting surface. The point is emphasized by the pic. But you are correct, sharp points will break easy, especially in kitchen or dining table. Point taken. (argg bad pun)
 

trc65

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I agree

Part of the presentation is that the photographer (me) is still a rank amateur with a camera. I have also noticed with asymmetrical turnings , 2d often depends on the orientation. I hope this illustrates.

View attachment 231356
Alan, thanks for the extra picture(s). You are right, a slight change in orientation makes all the difference in appearance, especially when viewed in 2D on a small screen! Looks well balanced in these pictures and I really like the long gently sloping curve on the "back" side of the mill. That simple curve leads my eye to the great details on both "ends" of the mill. Well done!
 

barry richardson

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Very unique forms, much more interesting than the usual mills! beautiful wood too. I would agree with Tim's original thought that they might bee a little too top heavy, it appears the diameter of the top is bigger, or maybe it's the same? Whatever... Perception is reality, as they say. Since you asked for a critique, consider making the base larger that the top, or the top smaller.... Just my 2 cents. BTW, I bet it's a little tricky not going through the sidewalls on those while turning?
 

Alan Sweet

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Barry;
BTW, I bet it's a little tricky not going through the sidewalls on those while turning?
I cheat a little. Even though the specs for normal grinder say 1 1/16" hollow through, it is not required. So, when designed the shape, I calculated where the narrow point is and when drilling out the center, I actually made a gap the is 3/4" rather than 1 1/16". It decreases the volume a sidgin, but does not affect the flow of the peppercorns. I have a self requirement that the walls must be at least 1/4". So by doing that I can deepen the cut in the area where the hole 3/4". Doesn't sound like much but it does give an external appearance difference.
 

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The comments about looks and proportion aside, I'd also focus on two things: (1) how do they feel in the hand and while grinding; (2) how stable are they while standing on the table or side board? If they fall over at the slightest bump of the table it would become a bother.

The shape reminds me of a reel seat on a spinning rod, so maybe you've already factored the "feel" portion in your design.
 
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TimR

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Very cool and technically challenging mills. I think it could be kind of cool to intentionally come out on the side and use a piece of acrylic tubing to keep the peppercorns from spilling out. Also would obviously let you know what kind of peppercorns being used.
 
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