1. To all members, we have made some changes to the rules. We encourage you to take a moment and re-acquaint yourself with the rules.

What do you think???

Discussion in 'Wood Identification & Characteristics of Wood' started by Nubsnstubs, Dec 25, 2019.

  1. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,323
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    First name:
    Jerry
    A couple days ago I was out in the desert. I drove down into an area where there is a windmill, ans a huge dam for the desert. In that area was this Mesquite/Hackberry combination. Check it out.
    The Mesquite is near 24"+ at the crotch and the Hackberry looks to be a foot OD at the ground. In all my years snooping in the desert, I've never seen these two trees that close to each other.

    I took a good look at the enlarged picture, and noticed the rock has barbed wire all over it, and what looks like a corner post leaning on it. The post looks to be way past it's prime. So does the fence as it doesn't exist anymore.

    20191223_153727.jpg

    In 2 trips to that area, in less than 2 weeks, I got about 9-10 pretty large Mesquite and Catclaw burls, all over 12" OD. The trees were pushed out of the right of way when the roads were made about 1970. I cut and broke off the branches and loaded up the burls and stumps. I'll get some pictures tomorrow.

    This is the type of desert this area is in. This picture was taken about 200 yards from the trees pictured. Kitt Peak National Observatory can be seen about 20 miles away. All homes in this area are all off the grid. Some people have to haul their water in. All are using wind and solar for power. . .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

    20191213_135600.jpg
     
    • Way Cool Way Cool x 3
    • Like Like x 2
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2019
  2. Jason Goodrich

    Jason Goodrich Member Full Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    First name:
    Jason
    Very cool. What kind of shape are those burls after 50 years?
     
  3. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

    Messages:
    3,177
    Likes Received:
    1,001
    Location:
    northeastern PA
    First name:
    Mark
    Catclaw, Acacia gregii, now Senegalia gregii, nope, no burled samples in the collection. Keep me in mind if you land more.

    What kind of hackberry? See it still has a lot of smooth bark at that size. Netleaf, Celtis reticulata? If so, I have a single sample from a small plant and am looking for a flat sawn and 1/4 sawn sample from a larger tree.

    Happy Boxing Day Jerry.
     
  4. Mike Hill

    Mike Hill The Bard of Barbecue Full Member

    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    482
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    First name:
    Mike
    That's what you call up close and personal!
     
  5. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,323
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    First name:
    Jerry
    Jason, woods pulled out of the ground in Arizona have a tendency to stay intact and solid for longer than 50 years. These were all collected on a ridge the road was cut on. When the wood got rained on, it quickly dried from the wind and sun. Most of the bark fell off years ago, except the bark that didn't get exposed to the elements. When I cut the branches from the stumps, they looked like they had been down only a year or so, but I know the road was cut back in the 70's by a Mining company.

    About 8 years ago, I was shopping again in the desert, and came across a small stump that was standing about 10-12" above ground level. It was completely stripped of any bark with a soft punky wood about 1/16" thick on it's surface. The tap root was the only support keeping it upright.

    Using scientific evidence from the Petrified Forest National Park, erosion is at one tenth inch per year. For every 10 years, 1" of soil erodes away. This area's weather is similar to PFNP's, my guess is that at 10" above the ground this piece is near or over 100 years dead. The colors are exceptional with a piece of Mesquite that's been dead that long...... Jerry (in Tucson)
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2019
  6. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,323
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    First name:
    Jerry
    Mark when I cut into the Catclaw, I'll try my best to get you a sample. The mistake I made was letting the guy that I took out there keep most of what we got. He got the stumps that definitely were burls. I think one of the stumps I kept has burl and is Catclaw.

    You have any knowledge of why they went from Acacia to Senegalia?

    Don't know what the Hackberry is. It's local here in Arizona. In larger wash banks, there are a ton of them. At 2000 - 4000+ feet I find them.......... I always thought they were Ash looking because of the grain, but people have said it's Hackberry. ......... Jerry (in Tucson)
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2019
  7. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

    Messages:
    3,177
    Likes Received:
    1,001
    Location:
    northeastern PA
    First name:
    Mark
    No big deal. You use that wood however. Maybe ask the guy you were with if he has extra on the Catclaw..?..

    The name thing originally was to separate acacias on one continent from those on another since there are so many. After that, I'd have to look it up.

    Thanks
     
  8. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,323
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    First name:
    Jerry
    Okie dokie, finally got around to taking pictures.

    This first one is definitely Mesquite. The side you can't see is gone, leaving me with a 3/4 burl, about 10" OD. The other 2 are weights to keep my saw covered in wet weather, Mesquite and Eucalyptus. . 20191228_091947.jpg

    Next is the largest verified Mesquite burl so far at 14+". 20191228_092002.jpg

    This is part of what I collected on the 2 trips. The piece in the center with the horizontal Ax cut is Catclaw for sure. I cut the bottom end off to verify what it is. the others are more than likely Mesquite. In case size of that pile needs to be determined, the bricks are 4 x 8's.
    20191228_092031.jpg

    This is Mesquite at 14+ OD. It' also has the finest eyes I've collected so far. It's on the top left of the above picture.
    20191228_092040.jpg
    This small one is a mystery right now. Won't cut it until our weather clears. Raining since Christmas, and will be raining off and on for the next week. It's about 8-10" OD. I think it's Catclaw. I don't know what the top one is. Never paid any attention to when taking the pictures.
    20191228_092117.jpg

    This next one is Catclaw. It doesn't look very big, but it's over 36" long and the burl crotch section is at least 16-18" wide. Yummy, declawed Catclaw, and very dry.
    20191228_092126.jpg
    Two small burls, mystery wood until I cut into them. Could be Mesquite.
    20191228_092144.jpg

    Well, that's it for now. New Years day am probably going back out there and collect a piece of Juniper that I don't think grew in this part of the desert. It's at least 24" wide x 10 feet long. It looks like it was lightning struck, and only half of the trunk is there. I don't think it was brought in because I have a small piece I broke off it that has roots on it. below are 2 pictures of the piece I took the other day. Roots are clearly seen, and I don't think ranchers or dam builders would have dug up a tree. So far, at 4000 feet, I haven't seen any junipers anywhere in that part of the desert.

    20191228_092132.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Tony

    Tony Hardwood Enthusiast Staff Member Global Moderator Full Member

    Messages:
    16,003
    Likes Received:
    4,643
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    First name:
    Tony
    Cool stuff Jerry! Never heard of Catsclaw, I'll be interested to see it after you've done something with it.
     
  10. Nubsnstubs

    Nubsnstubs Where is it??? Full Member Thread Starter

    Messages:
    1,323
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    First name:
    Jerry
    Greenhorns don't know they've encountered a Catclaw bush until they get home, take off any long sleeved shirt and pants they were wearing and notice trails of dried blood on their arms and legs. Then you trace the blood trail to the source, and see a nice scratch or scratches. My advice to greenhorns, don't follow whoever takes you into the desert. If they say shorts and a Tee shirt is OK, don't believe them..
    Catclaw is Acacia Gregii, or as Mark Peet says is Senegalia Gregii. The wood is a beautiful Red Wine color. (coming from a colorblind person) Trust me, it's red, and stays that way. The biggest problem with getting Catclaw, is the parent trees keep their litters around them, causing all kinds of damage to people and their clothing
    The best way to negotiate a Catclaw patch is to step on the offspring while walking up to the larger tree. Keep those damn thorns as close to the ground as possible.
    There is a saying about the desert. It's "Everything in the desert is designed to hurt you.".................. Jerry (in Tucson)
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. trc65

    trc65 Member Full Member

    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Cameron, Illinois
    First name:
    Tim
    Interesting Jerry, never heard of catsclaw either. Be interesting to see the wood when you get into it.

    I enjoy your little travelogues when you go on gathering trips. That environment is so foreign to me having lived only in the Midwest.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  12. Eric Rorabaugh

    Eric Rorabaugh Member Full Member

    Messages:
    4,350
    Likes Received:
    1,757
    Location:
    Wytheville, VA
    First name:
    Eric
    I wish I could travel out there and join you on one of those escapades!
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  13. Wildthings

    Wildthings ASTROS 2019 WORLD CHAMPION VIDEO PLAYERS Full Member

    Messages:
    5,690
    Likes Received:
    1,622
    Location:
    Gulf Coast of Texas
    First name:
    Barry
    AHHHH yes catclaw!! I think we have been introduced. If I'm thinking right they have a bottle brush shaped flower in cream to pale yellow color. The introduction didn't go well...at least on my side!

    And in West Texas it's "Everything is designed to stick you, sting you, scratch you or bite you."
     
  14. JR Parks

    JR Parks Member Full Member

    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    540
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    First name:
    Jim
    Some small ones we call "wait a bit" with inward facing claws-cat claws. You get in a small bush and you wait a bit while gently backing up in the right places before you get out
     
Current Time: 11:01 AM