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What is this

Discussion in 'Wood Identification & Characteristics of Wood' started by Karda, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Hi, I found some wood at the curb but no brush, any Idea what it is thanks mike

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  2. phinds

    phinds Moderator Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    My guess is birch but I really don't know squat about those "tree" thingies.

    Calling @Mr. Peet
     
  3. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    here is a side shot but its chain saw rough

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  4. Eric Rorabaugh

    Eric Rorabaugh Member Full Member

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    I would say Bradford pear but what do I know
     
  5. phinds

    phinds Moderator Global Moderator Forum Moderator Founding Member Full Member

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    Still looks like birch to me. If that's freshly split then it doesn't have enough red/purple color to be Bradford pear, but if that has been exposed for some time (several weeks, I think) then it could be.
     
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  6. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    I don't know when this tree was cut but the shavings still fell wet . the light shavings have a pale yellow cast. Not enough to say its yellow but the impression is there
     
  7. ClintW

    ClintW Member Full Member

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    Poplar or Aspen
     
  8. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    never thought of poplar
     
  9. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    Quaking aspen, Populus tremuloides about 90% confident. Having buds would seal the thought. Other possibles, Balsam poplar, Silver poplar and hybrid poplar.
     
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  10. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    I found a sapling about 10 inches from the stump, there were others as well. I also found some dead leaves around the other stump. They remind me of poplar but I don't know it that well. I would have looked when I got the wood but I was holding up traffic

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  11. Mike Hill

    Mike Hill The Bard of Barbecue Full Member

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    That little tree - we call White Poplar around these parts Populus Alba The bark on the second pic is a dead ringer for the bark. I've seen it many times with those diamond shaped splits.
     
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    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  12. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    ok thanks I appreciate you help
     
  13. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    @Mike Hill

    That leaf and seedling are a match for Silver poplar, aka White poplar along with a few other names. So Mike is right (good chance seedling is attached to the bigger stump as they are clonal species).

    Mike, that diamond pattern is common on many Popple species and Willow species as well during different bark development stages.

    The larger growth rings is why I was considering Silver or a hybrid poplar...
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  14. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    thanks Mike that is good to know
     
  15. Mike Hill

    Mike Hill The Bard of Barbecue Full Member

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    Marc,
    Hellfire Marc, I spoke up like I was an expert or something. In reality, I did not know about white poplar until last year. Wifey and I were driving down a "country" lane here in Williamson County. In reality there are no country lanes here - Williamson County is one of the wealthiest counties in the nation - but we needed to get to Leipers Fork. A lot of country stars live in the area we were driving through. Look up Alan Jackson's house for an example. I noticed some small seedling trees near the Harpeth River whose reverse side was white. The sight intrigued me and stopped for a better look. Collected a few branches, some cuttings and pulled up a small seedling. Cuttings did not take, but the seedling lives. Did some on 'net research and found out it was white poplar. Did not know they were also called silver poplar. They are not listed as a species in TN on most lists - especially since considered an invader and not welcome. We have many, many tulip poplars (our state tree) and only a black poplar is sometimes listed as a native (?), but have not seen a "native" one. I have not seen the diamond pattern on the tulip poplars around here, but I have seen the rough mature bark be somewhat crisscrossy, diamondy rather than long fissures.

    The other clue, to me was what appears to be a catkin nestled between the logs at the top right of the picture. Again, the only reason I recognized it was because of last year!

    The very small patch of white poplar was the only one I have ever noticed. Went back late this past winter to collect more seedlings, but like a lot of things here in and around Nashville, it was graded over and sodded over with "native" lawn grass and a new house. How stupid, that land has flooded more than once in just the last few years. I think the stupid gene is prevalent in Mid. Tennessee, and is growing at an epidemic rate.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019 at 8:02 AM
  16. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    thats ok you new the subject and thats what counts. Expert or not I appreciate the information. Another question, I have used poplar lumber and it has a green cast will this also get green as it dries. I am a wood turner and I can't think of what to do with green wood Thanks, mike
     
  17. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    No, it is rarely green. The golden yellows, tans, creme and white. Look up Dario on here, @Buga he has several posts with White poplar.
     
  18. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    Tulip poplar - Liriodendron tulipifera (magnolia family), White poplar - Populus alba (willow family), not at all closely related. Another place where common names cause issues. The 'Populus' group includes Aspens and Cottonwoods..
     
  19. Karda

    Karda Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    thats good to know, i am not familiar with green poplar only some lumber I have and from forum that mention the green cast. I haven't turned it yet but will soon. I was looking up poplars for something and there were 9 different trees in the poplar family. Its confusing especially the regional names. I knew a woman who called the trees in her front yard cottonwood. They are silver maples. I don't know where she is from but that is what she learned that what they are
     
  20. Mr. Peet

    Mr. Peet Member Full Member

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    New York state has plenty of Quaking aspen, lesser numbers of Eastern Cottonwood, lesser yet of Bigtooth aspen and fewer yet of Balsam poplar. Landscapes have Silver poplar, Hybrid poplar, Balm of Giliad, and Lombardy poplar (male or female phenotypes). There are a few others, but these cover most.

    As for the misguided lady, a dingle hopper is not a fork, but plenty of children mix the names because of a simple line in a Disney movie. I hope you informed her of reality.
     
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