Wood ID help

JD1137

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This wavy growth ring pattern might be obvious to some of you. Just saw a few logs in the parking lot of a local golf course and snapped a couple pics. Rainy here so wood is wet. Log diameter about 12”.

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phinds

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One of the species of Elm? Possibly Syberian Elm.
Doesn't seem possible, given the strong rays (these do not occur in elm) and the growth ring pattern.

Very likely it is some kind of white oak. Here's about a 1.5" wide pic of a white oak core. Note the rays and the indented type of growth rings. Neither or these are present in elm

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JD1137

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I say for sure oak, but not white as in Q. alba. Find any acorns or leaves to help?
I’ll swing by tomorrow (hopefully) and grab a chunk, or two. Will help to get a better pic and rip the log in half.
No branches (or leaves) as they probably chipped-up when the tree was cut down.
The groundskeeper told me a couple years ago they pile up the logs during the winter months and call in a tree service company, to come and pick up, in “the spring”…… so soon.
 

Mr. Peet

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I’ll swing by tomorrow (hopefully) and grab a chunk, or two. Will help to get a better pic and rip the log in half.
No branches (or leaves) as they probably chipped-up when the tree was cut down.
The groundskeeper told me a couple years ago they pile up the logs during the winter months and call in a tree service company, to come and pick up, in “the spring”…… so soon.
And look for acorns....
 

phinds

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The variant colors and the bark still tell me Siberian Elm
As far as color goes, that's a reasonable analysis, but you CANNOT ignore the rays. It CANNOT be elm.

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JD1137

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A few more pics. Most of the native White Oaks here in Northern IL are predominantly Quercus alba and Bur Oak, along with some Swamp White Oak and Chinkapin Oak.
This came from a golf course and wasn’t “that big” to necessarily be a native Oak to our area. No branches/leaves or acorns in vicinity of logs.
Thanks for checking it out
@phinds
@Mr. Peet

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phinds

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Can't be positive but there SEEM to be enough open pores that it is likely that this is red oak. A blow-up of one section:
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phinds

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Although it's not as common in red oak, there ARE red oak species that have the same characteristics around the pith. Here's one:
1712267768581.png
 

Mr. Peet

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I was thinking Willow oak, but was waiting for acorns as it is nearly impossible to clean them all up. So I will stop at "oak" for now. Very strange being a smaller tree on a golf coarse that it was not mapped and ID'ed at one time. I know most PGA courses are mapped and detailed with tree, shrub and grass identifications along with slope and aspect maps. Some of the courses I've been on are overwhelming analyzed.

That was my poor way of saying, I bet someone at the course knows your answer. Good luck.
 

Izak

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I recently came across some Apricot that had very orange sapwood when exposed to O2, and similar sandstone/cream variegation, your piece is probably a little big to be Cot though.
 

Mr. Peet

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I recently came across some Apricot that had very orange sapwood when exposed to O2, and similar sandstone/cream variegation, your piece is probably a little big to be Cot though.
The size of the rays discount Apricot as a choice. The strong ring porous nature also excludes Apricot.
 
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