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Workbench Build

DLJeffs

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Great idea. I bet the hockey pucks are dense enough they don't compress or mushroom over time either.
 

Tony

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That's pretty cool Matt, but what is a hockey puck? We don't have those down here :sarcastic: :sarcastic:
 

Sprung

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After an extremely busy week, I'm able to take a few days and get some down time. I'm spending some of that down time in the shop.

Last night I straightened up in the shop, got my radial arm saw dialed back in, and cut the legs to length. Today I drilled the legs for the coupler nuts that hold the levelling feet. I drilled a 3/4" hole to drive the nuts into, and then continued with a 5/8" bit for the length of bolt to continue past the nut.

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To attach the stretchers to the legs, I decided to get out my Domino and make use of that. Sure is fast and easy!

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Dry fit of one end.

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Tomorrow I'm hoping to sand everything so I can then glue up each of the ends. Once those are glued, I'll then attach the longer stretchers. Then I'll be able to start cutting mortices into the bottom of the top to accept the tenons on the tops of the legs.
 

DLJeffs

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I'm so jealous of this bench.

I have a question (hopefully doesn't detract from Matt's post): When you're laminating boards to make legs or a bench top or whatever, how important is it to alternate grain direction? I was looking at Matt's photos above and noticed that on some legs, he alternated the grain direction (ie one board the end grain curves to the right, the next board the end grain curves to the left). Does alternating grain make a laminated piece substantially stronger? Does it matter?
 
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Sprung

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Doug, here's where I am going to admit that, when gluing it up, I paid no attention to the grain direction of each board!

Whether or not it matters is a debated topic. For this kind of lamination work, I doubt it matters. If you're edge gluing up into a panel, such as for a table top, then it's more likely to matter.
 

DLJeffs

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Thanks Matt. That's kind of what I was thinking. With this size wood, it probably doesn't make much difference. Maybe with thinner wood it would be enough to make it worth alternating grain. Maybe not a strength issue, more of a "stay straight" issue.
 

El Guapo

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This is clearly just one big elaborate plan to brag about your Festool domino joiner!!!

Just kidding... great build thread, Matt! Love the pics/progress!
 

Sprung

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Some more progress!

Got the ends glued up.

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Then the whole base got glued up.

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And taken out of clamps.

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The bottom side of the top needed mortices for the tenons to sit in. First I marked their locations, then drilled out much of the waste witha forstner bit.

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Then out came chisel and mallet.

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And the top and the base were put together, some epoxy went into the mortices. Then a first coat of finish got applied. I'm using Watco Danish Oil in Natural, since I have a jug on hand that needs to be used up.

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Bottom side of the top.

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And there were a few boards that has some curl here and there. I planned for the front pieces of the front legs to show off some curls, even if they are kinda hard to see.

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Tomorrow I'll apply a couple more coats of finish to the base and underside of the top.
 

Sprung

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Since this is going to also serve as the outfeed for my table saw, that determined the height. I'll use the levelling feet to set it just a hair below the bottom of the miter slots on my table saw so that when I use a miter gauge or a sled, it clears the workbench.

I debated making it level with the top of the table saw, but I really don't want to put a couple groves in this bench to continue the miter slots.
 

sprucegum

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Since this is going to also serve as the outfeed for my table saw, that determined the height. I'll use the levelling feet to set it just a hair below the bottom of the miter slots on my table saw so that when I use a miter gauge or a sled, it clears the workbench.

I debated making it level with the top of the table saw, but I really don't want to put a couple groves in this bench to continue the miter slots.
Bench is looking great and you will never notice the bench being slightly lower than the saw for 99% of the work.
 

sprucegum

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This is clearly just one big elaborate plan to brag about your Festool domino joiner!!!

Just kidding... great build thread, Matt! Love the pics/progress!
Kind of glad he did I didn't even know what it was till I googled it. Then I knew I needed one until I saw how much they cost. Looks like a great tool but I guess I will have to struggle along with the old plunge router.
 

El Guapo

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Kind of glad he did I didn't even know what it was till I googled it. Then I knew I needed one until I saw how much they cost. Looks like a great tool but I guess I will have to struggle along with the old plunge router.
Way too much dough for how much I would use it or need it, but the guys I know who do a lot of joinery say it is one of the best tools in their shop.
 

DLJeffs

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Way too much dough for how much I would use it or need it, but the guys I know who do a lot of joinery say it is one of the best tools in their shop.
It's one of those things you convince your neighbor he has to have. Then you just borrow his.
 

Sprung

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I bought mine second hand, so I saved a little off new. This is the second project I've used the Domino on, and it's been great. It was a purchase I debated for some time and decided to go for, especially since I have plenty of furniture builds coming up over the next years. It was either this or a mortiser, and this is what I ended up with. I'm happy so far.
 

Sprung

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The base and underside of the top ended up with 3 coats of finish. Monday it was dry, so I applied a coat of paste wax to just the base portion. After waxing the base, I got it set on the floor right side up. This morning I was able to sand it, then did a wipe down with water to raise the grain. I think raising the grain is important before final sanding, especially on a surface that will see a lot of use. I gave it a final light sanding this evening to smooth out the raised grain. Then applied the first coat of finish.

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Tomorrow I'll apply the other two coats of finish. Once it's dried, I'll get it in place, adjusted to the right height, and levelled. I'll give the finish at least a few days to cure before I install the vise.

It may not happen right away, but I will get dog holes drilled at some point. I also want to eventually build a cabinet that will go under the bench. Or, at the very least, a shelf. Not sure yet which way I will go. This bench has been very design as I go. I figured out what size I wanted the top to be, and just went from there.

This is going to be such a great surface to work on. It's the kind of workbench I've been wanting for some time.
 
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