Workbench

Alan R McDaniel Jr

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I like to make bowls and trays using a Lancelot tool. I've always had trouble securing the work piece while using the woodworking weapon (Lancelot tool). I cut some slabs from a piece of a live oak tree that fell in the yard earlier this year and decided to make a workbench that I could move outside the shop and still hold the work securely. I wanted it outside because the wood chips from the L-tool go everywhere and get into everything. I made a vice so I can hold the work vertically and keep a good grip on the Tasmanian Devil while I'm working. It works good and is heavy enough to keep things steady. It's also very rough so I won't get my feelings hurt if I hit it with the tool. It's pictured with a bolt for the vice handle. I've since put a piece of 3/8" pipe with caps in its place.

Alan



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ripjack13

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Very cool. I like it.
 

barry richardson

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That's a great Idea! I use a Shopmate for a similar purpose. Please post some of your carvings in the carvers forum, would love to see them....
 

DLJeffs

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You move that beast in and out of your shop? I also prefer to work in my driveway for the same reason you mentioned so my saw and a portable work bench all are on lockable casters. This one I made from a cabinet we took out from downstairs. I did the same for a router table. When the casters are locked, it doesn't go anywhere. Wish I would have incorporated some sort of vice like you did.

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Alan R McDaniel Jr

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For wood removal it is the best. You've got to keep hold of the grinder with both hands. You also must use a trigger activated grinder. You want it to start slowing down as soon as it gets away from you. If you gouge with it, it WILL get away from you, and it will do it faster than you can say "OHSH!" You have to work with the side of the saw and only pull toward you.

On green wood all of the above are magnified.

It will deposit little wood chips in every crevice, nook and cranny. I only used mine once in the new shop. I was looking for my drop cloths on a shelf 7' off the ground and in a plastic container 4' back on the shelf. There were Lancelot wood chips on top of the container.

But, if you don't kill yourself or worse, it's a great little tool for wood carving.

Alan
 

Alan R McDaniel Jr

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This is a bowl I made for #1 wife from green pecan. It was a rush job for Thanksgiving decorations and she wanted rustic. She got rustic.

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A small bowl I made for #1 wife for her desk when she was working. Now it gathers dust.

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Those are all I have on this computer.

Alan
 

djg

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Very functional bench. I agree with the idea of being rustic/no worries. How did you transition from SAE threads to pipe threads? Is that Acme rod?
 

gimpy

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Clever, I like what you did
and love the vise
only my $0.02 worth, I'm thinking
I would have put a vise at each end

I may still your idea, if you don't mind
 

Alan R McDaniel Jr

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No problem, steal away!

The jaw is on runners (on either side) that slide back and forth under the bench top and are held up by cross pieces bolted to the bench top.

Alan


The nut on the jaw of the vice is held in place by the flat of the angle iron and the 1/4 set screw(bolt) tapped into the angle iron. The two nuts on the end of the rod are locked and stop the vice before it unscrews from the bench.
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The 1/2" nipple is locked against the first nut, then a washer, then the angle iron, then another washer and two nuts locked, and another washer against the immobile bench brace.
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two set screws locking the 1/2" T to the all thread rod. 3/8 x 6" nipple, capped on both ends forms the handle.
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djg

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For wood removal it is the best. You've got to keep hold of the grinder with both hands. You also must use a trigger activated grinder. You want it to start slowing down as soon as it gets away from you. If you gouge with it, it WILL get away from you, and it will do it faster than you can say "OHSH!" You have to work with the side of the saw and only pull toward you.

On green wood all of the above are magnified.

It will deposit little wood chips in every crevice, nook and cranny. I only used mine once in the new shop. I was looking for my drop cloths on a shelf 7' off the ground and in a plastic container 4' back on the shelf. There were Lancelot wood chips on top of the container.

But, if you don't kill yourself or worse, it's a great little tool for wood carving.

Alan
I've got a knock off from ebay. You're right about both hands, and that's sometimes not enough. I was grinding a header on the underside of my deck to fit a door frame (long story) and the grinder got away from me. Cut a nice gash in the nearby gutter which I now have to fix.
 

BangleGuy

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I just looked up Lancelot tool... looks like the creation of a madman!
I had to look up the Lancelot tool also. That’s a beast! I have something similar still in an unopened package. This summer I was cutting corrugated metal for an outbuilding project using an angle grinder / metal cutting blade and put a nice groove in my index finger. This Lancelot tool would separate a finger from your hand in a hurry!
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