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A true Texas fact

Discussion in 'Kenbo's Chat Room' started by woodman6415, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Location:
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    wendell
    One of our favorite places to visit ..
    Last year rode the bike

    How to get to Big Bend from Fort Davis:

    "You go south from Fort Davis
    Until you come to the place
    Where rainbows wait for rain....
    And the river is kept in a stone box
    And water runs uphill.
    And the mountains float in the air.
    Except at night,
    When they run away to play
    With other mountains."

    Directions from an old vaquero, as told to Dallas journalist Frank Tolbert. One of my own photos.
    Traces of Texas

    64F0E9B0-353D-4D29-AE2C-9D04F8B170FA.jpeg
     
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  2. Wildthings

    Wildthings ASTROS 2017 WORLD CHAMPIONS Full Member

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    Great Photo, Wendell. Never been there but planning to go sometime
     
  3. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    It is a great photo .. wish it was mine
    The guy that has the Traces of Texas page on Facebook travels all over Texas taking pictures .... you should go to big bend ... it’s a beautiful place ... spring and fall are the best times ... it gets really warm in summer
     
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  4. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    Have been to the springs many times .. still run clear

    Traces of Texas
    The Texas Quote of the Day:

    "The trail from Boquillas, Coahuila north into the United States [Big Bend] has been in use since Indian times. There have been many horse thieves, soldiers and outlaws, both American and Mexican, that have used it since back in the '80s. The Indians used it centuries before that. I have followed the tracks of stolen cattle and horses that were taken down the trail. Some of them I caught, some got across the Rio Grande into Mexico. McKinney Springs, the only water on the trail for over 60 miles, still runs clear and cold. The deer, panther, bobcats, javelina, coyotes and blue quail still water there, as they have for thousands of years. I have laid down on my belly on top of their tracks and drank the cold water countless times. Many a time, I have rolled out of my bedroll and spent the night in absolute solitude with no sound except [my horse] ''Old Red" eating the bunch grass, and now and then, a coyote barking.

    The drumming of the blue quail will wake you up at daylight, and occasionally a panther coming in for water will cause a little disturbance if you have hobbled your horse too close to the water. I don't know of any place on earth where the air is cleaner and the moon shines brighter than the McKinney Mountain area in Big Bend National Park. I don't blame the Indians for fighting for country like that. If I owned it, I would be damn hard to root out of there. There are graves beside the trail that attest to the fact that all that rode over it didn't make it. But I don't know of a better place to roost now. I like the sound of the desert wind, the sounds of the wildlife, and I like to hear the owls hoot."

    ----- C.M. "Buck" Newsome, retired border patrolman, "Shod With Iron," 1975
     
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  5. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    The Texas Quote of the Day:

    "I was just turning my sixth year when I had my first biscuits. It's a fact, and I was lucky to get 'em then for flour was not in general use until I was about 20. People all raised little patches of corn and bread made from that was all we had. Father took a trail herd up the year I was 6 and when he delivered it and collected the money he spent some of it for a wagon and flour enough to load it to the full. When he drove home with all that flour it was some sight. All of the neighbors came to see and share in it; for of course he let them have their part. I'll never forget it if I live to 100, how anxious I was to taste bread made of that white soft flour. Nor how good those first biscuits were. We saved every tiny crumb, for corn bread had never been plentiful enough to waste and biscuits were on a basis with cake those days.

    I was 16 years old before I had a pair of shoes that I could actually wear all the time. Rawhide was our only shoe material and all you could say for it was the hair was taken off. Talk about hard, dry, stiff, unbendable leather ------ that rawhide had the world beat and a mile to go on. If they were big enough to avoid all this trouble you couldn't walk in them, especially hunting, and we just had to hunt, for it was no trick at all to kill a big buck deer or antelope, a buffalo or all the wild turkey we could carry. And it was too much fun to give up just to wear shoes. A fellow with a grain of sense would rather trust to the calluses on his soles than to risk losing a shot and rubbing blisters on his feet with those rawhide hobbles. I might say honestly that I never did have any real shoe or boot comfort until I got my first pair of high-heeled, high-topped, hand-made cowboy boots. I still wear that kind, too, and always will for they are as much a part of me and every other open-range cowpuncher as his leather leggings, spurs and broad-brimmed hat."

    ----- Cowboy/rancher Jim Rose, quoted in the Dallas SemiWeekly Farm News, April 8, 1927
     
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  6. woodman6415

    woodman6415 Member Full Member Thread Starter

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    The Texas Quote of the Day:

    "The mesquite is an erratic tree. Instead of seeking the sky and competing with its neighbors for height, it crawls and wallows in the sand. Its trunk never grows straight up, nor does it limit itself to one trunk only. It may have several trunks, snaking along on the ground, suddenly leaping upward for a few feet only to duck down again or circle in another direction.

    Unpredictable, extravagant in space and growth, unexplainable, it is like a snake in many ways. Its leaves are forked and thread-like as a serpent's tongue, with branching petals arranged like ladder rungs, reflecting sunlight in a bewildering variety of directions. The shade of green thus created is rich and delicate beyond that of any other foliage in the world. In the spring it is spangled with yellow blooms destined to mature into long bean pods.

    Sometimes the mesquite is almost like a vine, so dependent does it seem on the ground for the support of its whole serpentine length. The trunk can support a vast spread of limbs because the wood is tough and strong; and, though flexible enough not to break under a strain, it is hard to bend at will. From a distance, the mesquite does not resemble a tree, but looks like a huge half-grove of green, bubbling out of the ground. Its most outspread branches usually scrape the sand.

    Under, or rather inside, this living dome is a sort of cove where cattle can find protection not from the sun, for the foliage is too thin to keep out many rays, but from the rope, the dehorning tongs, the branding iron, and other human instruments of pain.

    In the sandy land of the vast river bed between Norias and the Gulf coast, mesquites grow close together, sometimes no more than three feet apart, each shooting its harum-scarum branches into the midst of those of its neighbors. In places, they are impossible to get through on horseback. In the loam around Sauz, below the southern boundary of the sandy area, they also grow in abundance, providing a safe haven for the successors of the longhorn cattle that had originally brought them there."

    ----- Frank Goodwyn, "Life on the King Ranch," 1951

    KingRanch
     
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  7. Wildthings

    Wildthings ASTROS 2017 WORLD CHAMPIONS Full Member

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    What a great, accurate description of a cool tree
     
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